Why diamagnetic material is not repelled

So, while they are initially repelled, the magnet's strength is not strong enough to keep them away. Therefore, they eventually return to their original position. In summary, diamagnetic materials have atomic current loops that align to oppose an external magnetic field, resulting in weak magnetic behavior. This explains why materials like copper, which are diamagnetic, appear to be repelled by magnets but do not continue to be repelled indefinitely.
  • #1
kelvin490
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When an external magnetic field is applied to a diamagnetic materials, their atomic current loops will tend to align in such a way as to oppose the applied field. Diamagnetism is the residual magnetic behavior when materials are neither paramagnetic nor ferromagnetic and most materials are diamagnetic. Why don't these materials keep on repelled by a magnet? (e.g. we do see copper is repelled and fly away from a magnet)
 
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  • #2
kelvin490 said:
Why don't these materials keep on repelled by a magnet? (e.g. we do see copper is repelled and fly away from a magnet)

You might want to rewrite this - they seem to be contradicting each other.

Diamagnets are repelled by magnetic fields. However, most diamagnets are weak.
 

Related to Why diamagnetic material is not repelled

1. Why are diamagnetic materials not repelled by magnets?

Diamagnetic materials are not repelled by magnets because they possess no permanent magnetic dipole moment. This means that the individual atoms in a diamagnetic material have no net magnetic field and therefore cannot be affected by an external magnetic field.

2. How do diamagnetic materials interact with magnetic fields?

Diamagnetic materials interact with magnetic fields in a different way than ferromagnetic or paramagnetic materials. When exposed to a magnetic field, the electrons in a diamagnetic material will create a small current that opposes the external field. This results in a very weak repulsive force that is often not noticeable.

3. Can diamagnetic materials be magnetized?

No, diamagnetic materials cannot be magnetized. Unlike ferromagnetic or paramagnetic materials, which have their own magnetic fields that align with an external magnetic field, diamagnetic materials have no inherent magnetic properties. Therefore, they cannot be magnetized.

4. What are some examples of diamagnetic materials?

Some common examples of diamagnetic materials include gold, silver, copper, water, and most organic compounds. These materials are not attracted to magnets and will experience a weak repulsive force when exposed to a magnetic field.

5. How are diamagnetic materials used in everyday life?

Diamagnetic materials are used in a variety of everyday applications. For example, they are commonly used in MRI machines to create images of the body. They are also used in maglev trains, which use the repulsive force between magnets and diamagnetic materials to levitate and propel the train forward. Additionally, diamagnetic materials are used in some types of levitating toys and experiments, as well as in some types of electronic devices.

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