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I Why does hawking radiation in black holes slowly increase?

  1. Aug 29, 2016 #1
    First, what are these 'particles' that appear with their negative mass counterpart and suddenly disappear very quickly and why do they do that?

    Now, I know the positive mass ones are allowed to escape the event horizon while the negative mass doesn't, thus fall into the black hole, but how does the negative mass one cause the black hole to lose energy?
    is the negative mass particle just an "anti-energy" that sucks in whatever is inside the black hole?

    and most importantly, why does this get faster and faster as the black hole becomes smaller? All I can see is that there is less surface area for the black hole to pull in and leave out these things and thus it would slow down.

    Thank you!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 29, 2016 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    The picture you describe is not what happens. Hawking says so in his paper. It's a way to get comfortable with the idea, but you cannot draw conclusions from it.
     
  4. Aug 29, 2016 #3
    Everywhere I've looked they give this same similar explanation. Where can I find a better explanation of what actually happens?
     
  5. Aug 29, 2016 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    Hawking's original papers. Nature 248, 30 (1974) and Commun. Math. Phys. 43, 199 (1975)
     
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