Will there ever be nuclear powered cars?

In summary, the possibility of a fusion reactor the size of a small box or soda can is theoretically possible but the technology to achieve it may be hundreds or thousands of years away. The current methods of plasma and laser fusion are not capable of powering a car. If someone discovers a new physical principle, such as cold fusion, it could be a possibility. The necessary enabling inventions, such as a perfect neutron shield, would also need to be developed. The fear of a hydrogen bomb without radioactive material or limited uranium supplies is not a major concern compared to other global issues.
  • #1
KCL
35
0
Let's say 100 years from now... or 200. Whatever. Is it theoretically possible to make a fusion reactor the size of a small box... or a soda can?

And if this could be possible, will the tech be purposely hidden or outlawed because it'd mean easier access to small nuclear bombs for terrorists?
 
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  • #2
KCL said:
Let's say 100 years from now... or 200. Whatever. Is it theoretically possible to make a fusion reactor the size of a small box... or a soda can?

And if this could be possible, will the tech be purposely hidden or outlawed because it'd mean easier access to small nuclear bombs for terrorists?


Present work on fusion power falls into 2 broad classes, plasma and laser. Neither of them could ever be made small enough to drive a car.

The only possibility would be for someone to discover a new physical principle, such as cold fusion - which to date has never been successfullly demonstated.
 
  • #3
It is theoretically possible -- no laws of physics preclude it -- but the technology to achieve a fusion-powered car may well be hundreds or thousands of years away.

- Warren
 
  • #4
I don't think you need all that much energy for a car, and even a semi is only an order of magnitude greater. Safe bet that storage will always be easier than generation, though the lines tend to blur, (e.g., fuel cells, with fusion being a deuterium fuel cell). Isomer energy storage would fill the bill nicely I would think. In any event, one of the necessary enabling inventions would likely be a perfect neutron shield.

Ed
 
  • #5
Thanks for the replies!

Last question... if somebody figures out how to make a hydrogen bomb w/o a smaller fission bomb to start it off... are we screwed?

If there's no radioactive material to detect it and no restriction of limited uranium supplies... Wow, it's frightening to just think about it.
 
  • #6
KCL said:
Thanks for the replies!

Last question... if somebody figures out how to make a hydrogen bomb w/o a smaller fission bomb to start it off... are we screwed?

If there's no radioactive material to detect it and no restriction of limited uranium supplies... Wow, it's frightening to just think about it.

It is more frightening to think of global warming, suicide bombers, or even the sun burning out. The kind of H bomb you are concerned about requires physics that has not yet been discovered and may not exist.
 

1. Will nuclear powered cars be safe to drive?

Many people have concerns about the safety of nuclear powered cars. However, extensive research and testing has shown that these cars will have strict safety measures in place, making them no more dangerous than conventional cars. Additionally, nuclear power has been successfully used in other industries, such as powering submarines and aircraft carriers, demonstrating its reliability and safety.

2. How will nuclear powered cars work?

Nuclear powered cars will use a small nuclear reactor to generate heat, which will then be converted into electricity to power the car's motor. The reactor will use small amounts of nuclear fuel, such as uranium, to produce this heat. This technology is similar to what is used in nuclear power plants, but on a much smaller and safer scale.

3. Will nuclear powered cars be environmentally friendly?

One of the main benefits of nuclear powered cars is their potential to be environmentally friendly. These cars will produce no emissions, as they will not require any fossil fuels to run. Additionally, the amount of nuclear fuel used in the reactors will be minimal, making them a cleaner alternative to traditional cars.

4. How much will nuclear powered cars cost?

At this time, it is difficult to determine the exact cost of nuclear powered cars since they are still in the early stages of development. However, experts predict that the cost will be comparable to or even lower than that of traditional cars, as the technology becomes more advanced and widely available.

5. When can we expect to see nuclear powered cars on the market?

While there have been successful prototypes and tests of nuclear powered cars, it may still be several years before they are available for purchase. The technology and infrastructure required for these cars to become mainstream still need to be developed and implemented. However, with advancements in technology and a growing demand for cleaner transportation options, it is likely that we will see nuclear powered cars on the market in the near future.

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