Register to reply

Turbo-1's HOT STUFF

by Astronuc
Tags: evo, food, recipes, turbo, turbo1
Share this thread:
turbo
#37
Sep17-07, 02:24 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
Quote Quote by Math Jeans View Post
lol. So you use red habaneros and not orange ones?
I like to let them ripen fully, but the Maine climate does not allow me to fully ripen the whole crop, so we have to back down and process some orange and green ones, too, as frost threatens. I'm thinking of doing some large-container planting on our back deck next year to give them as much reflected sun and heat as I can, just to see if I can get a higher percentage of them to ripen together = bigger batches of relishes.
Math Jeans
#38
Sep17-07, 02:27 PM
Math Jeans's Avatar
P: 340
Well. I'll make up some of the relish as soon as I can and give you the results once iv gotten the materials for it. But ur talkin so someone who eats plain habaneros . I can't wait.
turbo
#39
Sep17-07, 03:11 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
Well, we ran out of habanero sauce earlier this year and had to resort to using peppers from the store, which are WAY wimpy compared to the ones on our garden. That relish from store-bought habaneros, you can eat on chips, crackers, etc as a snack with cheese, oysters, etc. Tasty, but not blistering hot. Our home-grown habanero relish will make you break out in a sweat, even if your mouth can stand the heat. Beware! (see the link I posted a few posts ago) Pepper vary greatly in hotness, even within types/species - if you can eat raw habaneros from a store, you would be well-advised to approach ours with some caution.
turbo
#40
Sep17-07, 07:34 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
Today, I processed a huge bag of sweet corn that my sister-in-law gave us last night, so I was shucking, boiling, slicing, and freezing this afternoon. She didn't leave empty-handed - we picked a large plastic shopping bag of apples from our largest apple tree and she'll be making pies, breads, and tarts for a while. While I was shucking corn, my father came down with a bag of buttercup squash that are too large for a single person to cook and eat, and we will supply him with more reasonable-sized squash as ours mature. While we were talking in the driveway, my vegetarian/organic gardening neighbor stopped by with his dog, and I gave him a couple of little jars of the new habanero relish. It's fall and the food is flying!!

When my wife got home from work, she picked all the red lipstick peppers and a few jalapenos, so I made up another batch of chili relish using those and lots of Russian garlic. I may have to save a jar for Christmas - the bright red lipsticks and the rich green jalapenos look very festive. Not blistering hot, but pretty darned hot, and very flavorful. I dropped off a jar of that at my neighbor's place tonight - we owe him, since he is providing all our German and Russian garlic cloves to help us establish our own sustainable yearly garlic crop.
Math Jeans
#41
Sep18-07, 10:13 AM
Math Jeans's Avatar
P: 340
I would love to live on your block. So jealous.
turbo
#42
Sep18-07, 10:49 AM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
Well there are about 10 houses on this 3-mile stretch of road, so I don't know if you could call it a block.
Math Jeans
#43
Sep18-07, 01:35 PM
Math Jeans's Avatar
P: 340
well. my main point was...I want your food.
Math Jeans
#44
Sep18-07, 03:00 PM
Math Jeans's Avatar
P: 340
Quote Quote by turbo-1 View Post
Habanero relish is easy.

Get a couple of dozen habanero peppers and a whole bulb of garlic. Remove the stems from the peppers, leaving the seeds, placentas, etc intact (that's where the heat is!), separate and peel the cloves of garlic and chop the peppers and garlic thoroughly in a food processor. Cook the chopped stuff in about a cup of vinegar, until it's the consistency you want, and add about a tsp each of salt and sugar, and a couple of tbs of molasses. Spoon into sterilized jelly jars, top with sterilized lids and rings and process the sealed jars in boiling water for 20 minutes. You might get up to 4 little 1/2 cup jars of relish, depending on the size of the habaneros.
Well, I just ran into a problem. My parents won't allow me to do the canning process (mainly because one of my relatives is a biologist and now they are paranoid about bacteria), so if I make a small batch and eat it within a couple of days, could I avoid it?
Math Is Hard
#45
Sep18-07, 03:12 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Math Is Hard's Avatar
P: 4,922
Quote Quote by Math Jeans View Post
Wow. I gotta try some of that habanero relish ;-). The spiciest salsa that I hav access to is store bought hot salsa which I drown in cayenne pepper. I gotta step up :D.
I knew you were one of us right away.

We have some serious hotsauce/salsa fans here.
turbo
#46
Sep18-07, 03:39 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
Quote Quote by Math Jeans View Post
Well, I just ran into a problem. My parents won't allow me to do the canning process (mainly because one of my relatives is a biologist and now they are paranoid about bacteria), so if I make a small batch and eat it within a couple of days, could I avoid it?
The little canning jars are made for canning and freezing. Make as much as you want, and freeze it. Take one jar at a time out of the freezer for use and keep it refrigerated - you'll be fine. The thing about bacteria is that if you keep the food chilled, the bacteria can't gain a foothold or multiply.

The concern about home-canning is that you are going to store those jars of food at room temperature, and if you haven't properly processed the food and sterilized the jars and lids, some bacteria can multiply and produce toxins. Probably the worst one is listeria, that thrives in de-oxygenated environments. This is not a concern with frozen foods, so have your parents talk to the biologist and confirm what I have told you, and they'll probably let you use the alternate method of preservation - freezing. Good luck.

If you want to make up really small batches, refrigerate it, and use it in a timely fashion, you are no more at risk of food poisoning that you are from eating some salad or casserole from the fridge that is a few days old, especially since the vinegar drives the pH so low that most bacteria can't get a foothold, anyway, and you're boiling the relish to cook it. Normal kitchen hygiene is sufficient to keep you safe if you aren't going to jar it and store it at room temperature. We HAVE to can our salsas, because there is no other reasonable way to store it. We already have two chest freezers full and the big freezer in our fridge is full of food, so cupboards and pantries and tables down cellar have to be our storage facilities. If I shoot a deer this year, we may have to shuffle a lot of food to my father's freezer to make room for the venison.
Math Jeans
#47
Sep18-07, 03:49 PM
Math Jeans's Avatar
P: 340
Quote Quote by turbo-1 View Post
The little canning jars are made for canning and freezing. Make as much as you want, and freeze it. Take one jar at a time out of the freezer for use and keep it refrigerated - you'll be fine. The thing about bacteria is that if you keep the food chilled, the bacteria can't gain a foothold or multiply.

The concern about home-canning is that you are going to store those jars of food at room temperature, and if you haven't properly processed the food and sterilized the jars and lids, some bacteria can multiply and produce toxins. Probably the worst one is listeria, that thrives in de-oxygenated environments. This is not a concern with frozen foods, so have your parents talk to the biologist and confirm what I have told you, and they'll probably let you use the alternate method of preservation - freezing. Good luck.

If you want to make up really small batches, refrigerate it, and use it in a timely fashion, you are no more at risk of food poisoning that you are from eating some salad or casserole from the fridge that is a few days old, especially since the vinegar drives the pH so low that most bacteria can't get a foothold, anyway, and you're boiling the relish to cook it. Normal kitchen hygiene is sufficient to keep you safe if you aren't going to jar it and store it at room temperature. We HAVE to can our salsas, because there is no other reasonable way to store it. We already have two chest freezers and the big freezer in our fridge full of food, so cupboards and pantries and tables down cellar have to be our storage facilities. If I shoot a deer this year, we may have to shuffle a lot of food to my father's freezer to make room for the venison.

So I can make a full batch and put it in a can, but freeze it instead of having to process it? Then when I'm about to eat it I can just stick some in the fridge?
turbo
#48
Sep18-07, 04:08 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
Quote Quote by Math Jeans View Post
So I can make a full batch and put it in a can, but freeze it instead of having to process it? Then when I'm about to eat it I can just stick some in the fridge?
That's the idea. If you can get a case of the little Ball jelly jars with lids and rings, you'll be all set to experiment with chili relishes. The jars are designed to be used for freezing or canning. Freezing the relishes promptly after you jar them, and keeping them refrigerated as you thaw and use them is a good way to go. My wife and I just don't have the freezer capacity to put up all our pickles, salsas, and chili relishes, so we can't use that method, unless we have a walk-in freezer installed. That picture I posted was of our smallest cupboard. We have another much larger one under the counter that is full, and we are putting salsas and other processed canned food in our ceiling-to-floor pantry cupboard with sliding doors.
Math Jeans
#49
Sep18-07, 07:29 PM
Math Jeans's Avatar
P: 340
I'm going to attempt to get the materials for the habanero relish this weekend (I know they arn't as good as home grown. Don't rub it in). But before I do, do you have a really really hot salsa recepes we well? (Tell me if I'm being too nosy). .
turbo
#50
Sep18-07, 08:18 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
It's really pretty loose around here. My wife and I just grab what we've got and go with it. We might have a few gallons of red tomatoes or green ones, and we'll scald them in boiling water then shock them in cold water. That makes peeling them easier. I think it's helpful to quarter the tomatoes so they de-water more easily, and start simmering them down with a few cups of vinegar. Once the tomatoes are simmered down to about the consistency that you'd consider using for salsa you chop and add onions and every kind of peppers (bell, sweet, and chilies) you can get with LOTS of garlic and some salt. Simmer until the chilies are getting cooked down and incorporated, and then season to taste. You may want to add more hot stuff, maybe some herbs, and CERTAINLY some cilantro before canning. This can take hours spread over a couple of days, so save your fresh herbs for the last hurrah, so their flavors will be strongest in the finished product.

People up here run rafting companies, guided snowmobile tours, etc to encourage tourism. Maybe I should start a school of salsa... With all the variables, there's no real formula, but until you've done it a few times how do you know what works?

David, if you lived here and wanted some of our hot foods, I would make you tend and weed my peppers, and harvest them, but in return I'd teach you how to make them into fantastic foods that you cannot find in stores anywhere.
Evo
#51
Sep18-07, 08:24 PM
Mentor
Evo's Avatar
P: 26,524
turbo, do you wear gloves on your hands when you cut the peppers? That stuff can really linger on your hands.
turbo
#52
Sep18-07, 08:32 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
Quote Quote by Evo View Post
turbo, do you wear gloves on your hands when you cut the peppers? That stuff can really linger on your hands.
Nope. But I don't rub my face or eyes after, either. I generally handle the peppers by rinsing them under cold water, removing stems (slicing or otherwise) and chopping them either with knives or a food processor. Once, when I was snapping stems from habaneros, I scraped off the little "skirts" of those stems with my thumbnail. Once was enough.
Math Jeans
#53
Sep18-07, 08:39 PM
Math Jeans's Avatar
P: 340
Quote Quote by turbo-1 View Post
It's really pretty loose around here. My wife and I just grab what we've got and go with it. We might have a few gallons of red tomatoes or green ones, and we'll scald them in boiling water then shock them in cold water. That makes peeling them easier. I think it's helpful to quarter the tomatoes so they de-water more easily, and start simmering them down with a few cups of vinegar. Once the tomatoes are simmered down to about the consistency that you'd consider using for salsa you chop and add onions and every kind of peppers (bell, sweet, and chilies) you can get with LOTS of garlic and some salt. Simmer until the chilies are getting cooked down and incorporated, and then season to taste. You may want to add more hot stuff, maybe some herbs, and CERTAINLY some cilantro before canning. This can take hours spread over a couple of days, so save your fresh herbs for the last hurrah, so their flavors will be strongest in the finished product.

People up here run rafting companies, guided snowmobile tours, etc to encourage tourism. Maybe I should start a school of salsa... With all the variables, there's no real formula, but until you've done it a few times how do you know what works?

David, if you lived here and wanted some of our hot foods, I would make you tend and weed my peppers, and harvest them, but in return I'd teach you how to make them into fantastic foods that you cannot find in stores anywhere.
I would definately attend your salsa school . It also appears that you saw the link to my hermit crab gallery. I think that for me, at this point salsa is not in my cooking range. I'll work on that relish though.
turbo
#54
Sep20-07, 12:44 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,363
The salsa/chili relish stuff really pays off. I'm in the midst of lunch - fresh garden tomato slices on Jewish rye bread with Cain's mayonnaise, salt, pepper, and a 50:50 mix of red tomato salsa and habanero relish. Mmmm! I might have to make another one.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Turbo alternator Mechanical Engineering 33
Turbo Fan Mechanical Engineering 7
Turbo Debugger Computing & Technology 1
Exponents in Turbo Pascal Computing & Technology 3