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Turbo-1's HOT STUFF

by Astronuc
Tags: evo, food, recipes, turbo, turbo1
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netgypsy
#793
Jan29-12, 08:54 PM
P: 239
Can't keep the deer out of the okra. They keep it pruned at about 8 inches tall. GRRRR They didn't get the peppers though. Maybe you just need to surround your garden with okra and they'll leave everything else alone??
Moonbear
#794
Jan29-12, 09:26 PM
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Quote Quote by netgypsy View Post
Can't keep the deer out of the okra. They keep it pruned at about 8 inches tall. GRRRR They didn't get the peppers though. Maybe you just need to surround your garden with okra and they'll leave everything else alone??
Lol! My deer even ate my jalapenos a couple years ago. Last year, I think I was doomed no matter what. The garden started well, I had a million blooms on everything, then the deer trampled through the fencing. What they didn't eat, they stomped on (I forgot to put netting on top of the garden, which deterred them the previous year when insects feasted on everything). Some of the plants started recovering, but then we had endless rain the rest of the season, and everything started rotting. It's the first year there were no extra zucchinis from anyone! We all had the same problem, we'd get one or two from a vine and the rest rotted before they got more than a few inches big, if they grew at all. A lot of blossoms rotted and didn't fruit.

I'm working on it. When I moved here, there was no good soil for gardening, just heavy clay and rocks and a few bits of coal. I expected a few bad years of getting the soil conditioned, and last year's good start was at least hopeful, but I'm tired of deer eating my dinner and then not sticking around to be my dinner, so I'll try some containers on my deck this year, at least for tomatoes. I found seeds for tiny tim tomatoes, which grew really well in a container indoors a few years ago, but I only had one plant from sale at the university greenhouse then, and never saw that variety since. They're like a cherry tomato.
Evo
#795
Jan29-12, 09:36 PM
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Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
I found seeds for tiny tim tomatoes, which grew really well in a container indoors a few years ago, but I only had one plant from sale at the university greenhouse then, and never saw that variety since. They're like a cherry tomato.
Buy grape tomatoes, they grow like a vine though and need a trellis, but grape tomatoes are awesome, and they produce heavily.
Moonbear
#796
Jan29-12, 09:53 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
Buy grape tomatoes, they grow like a vine though and need a trellis, but grape tomatoes are awesome, and they produce heavily.
I haven't seen them available and they aren't in any of the seed catalogs I get either. Maybe they don't grow well in my area so don't get sold around here.
netgypsy
#797
Jan29-12, 10:43 PM
P: 239
I had good luck with sweet 100. they even volunteered the second year
rhody
#798
Jan30-12, 11:00 AM
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Quote Quote by netgypsy View Post
Can't keep the deer out of the okra.
Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
Lol! My deer even ate my jalapenos a couple years ago.
netgypsy, Moonbear,

Folks here use three things to repel deer from a garden, are you ready for this:
  1. moth balls
  2. human hair
  3. deer away (comercial product, expensive)

I would try moth balls first, then God forbid, go to local barber shops and get bags of hair, ewww... or try the deer away. People I know have used moth balls and claim they work. Good luck with your frustrating problem.

Rhody...
turbo
#799
Jan30-12, 11:05 AM
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The first year we lived in this place, I planted a habanero bush that my sister-in-law had over-wintered indoors. A deer (maybe more than one) showed up that night and ate that pepper plant right down to ground level. Deer love peppers!
turbo
#800
Jan30-12, 11:45 AM
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Quote Quote by rhody View Post
would try moth balls first, then God forbid, go to local barber shops and get bags of hair, ewww... or try the deer away. People I know have used moth balls and claim they work. Good luck with your frustrating problem.

Rhody...
Blood meal works, too, but it is high in nitrogen and therefor is not a good additive to use around peppers. Peppers can grow and leaf-out like crazy with lots of nitrogen, but that inhibits budding and fruiting. Some of the people that show off huge pepper plants are probably over-using nitrogen. That causes over-foliation and inhibits ripening of the peppers. My season is so short that I can't afford to make that kind of mistake.
rhody
#801
Jan30-12, 12:25 PM
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Quote Quote by turbo View Post
The first year we lived in this place, I planted a habanero bush that my sister-in-law had over-wintered indoors. A deer (maybe more than one) showed up that night and ate that pepper plant right down to ground level. Deer love peppers!
Can you imagine a deer eating even one trinidad scorpion pepper ? At 1.4 million scoville ? I can't. Regular peppers, deer treats, super hot's, I don't think there will be a problem.

Rhody...
rhody
#802
Jan30-12, 02:06 PM
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I get google alerts for pepper keyword combinations, and thought I would share this one:

I Ate the World's Hottest Pepper This Weekend

Some peppers are described as producing a heat that concentrates in different areas of the mouth. You'll hear people talk about a warm glow at the back of the throat or a fiery concentration at the front of their mouth. I can attest that the the Trinidad Scorpion chili should be classified as an equal opportunity palate destroyer. This is a full-face experience.

About a minute after eating the sliver, I was experiencing a full-on glow that invoked a jet engine afterburn. At two minutes, waves of oscillating sensations washed over my skin, first warm, then oddly cool. I described the building heat, and the chili dude responded with a phrase that shook me to my very center. "Yeah, it will continue to build for about four to five minutes," he said.

It was at this point that I became a little nervous. I decided to go for a walk.

For the next ten or so minutes I waited in the beer line (milk is for pussies) and experienced wave after wave of what I can't describe as pain, really. There was an odd sweaty patch on the right backside of my head that felt cool. There was a sort of euphoria-laden glow rooted in my inner chemistry -- what I can only describe as the body's natural response to, and preparation for, my impending death. Synapses fired, dopamine was released, synapses fired again. It was like taking a "bump" of pure capsaicin.
and another pepper head is hooked...

Rhody...
turbo
#803
Jan30-12, 02:15 PM
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When I made my very first batch of red-ripe chili relish from Carribeans, I gave a little jar to my neighbor. He found it too hot to eat, but he took it to "sandwich night" at the paper mill when the crew would order in subs for their lunch. He hauled out that little jar and spread a little bit (probably very little) in his sub. A loudmouth that very ceremoniously put Tobasco on his sandwiches said "Give me some of that!" Al warned him to go easy, but the guy put on what he thought was a reasonable amount. He took a bite of his sandwich, turned red, started sweating, and threw the sandwich in the trash, swearing at Al for ruining his lunch. The next night, Al had to work a different shift, and I asked him not to ambush Randy that way. He got an evil look in his eye, and said that Randy had to take his chances.
rhody
#804
Jan30-12, 02:34 PM
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Just imagine what his response would have been if it had been ghost pepper relish, or God forbid scorpion pepper. For people who have huge ego's that is. It is always fun taking that kind of person down a notch or two. Having said that, I don't go looking for trouble, but if it does find me I let the relish and the pepper do the talking, case closed. People should be fully informed and aware before trying this stuff, and if they don't heed reasonable tasting advice, then I don't have a problem with it.

Rhody...
rhody
#805
Jan30-12, 02:47 PM
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netgypsy, Moonbear,

I watched this video, liquid fence, it works, stinks for two days, then the smell goes away.
Looks about the same price as the stuff in my last post. I would be interested to see if the moth ball,
or human hair would keep them away too, and for a lot cheaper.

Liquid Fence Deer Repellent



Rhody...
dlgoff
#806
Jan30-12, 03:38 PM
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Quote Quote by rhody View Post
netgypsy, Moonbear,

I watched this video, liquid fence, it works, stinks for two days, then the smell goes away.
Looks about the same price as the stuff in my last post. I would be interested to see if the moth ball,
or human hair would keep them away too, and for a lot cheaper.

Liquid Fence Deer Repellent



Rhody...
Don't believe everything you read.

Abstract: Food plots are a vital element for the survival of game bird species such as bobwhite
quail (Colinus virginianus) on Fort Riley Military Installation in Kansas. However, white-tailed
deer (Odocoileus virginianus) tend to eat the sorghum when it starts to ripen in September and
continue feeding on it through November and December, often leaving no food for the quail
during the winter. We conducted pen and field trails to determine if repellents were an effective
and feasible method to protect grain sorghum food plots from deer damage. Two-choice pen
trials with both deer and game bird species were used to determine preference and avoidance of
milo treated with Liquid Fence® and Plantskydd™. Individual food plots on Fort Riley were
used to test both repellents’ effectiveness in protecting a 6-row perimeter around established food plots. When given a choice both bobwhite quails and pheasants avoided Plantskydd (P < 0.001). Both repellents were avoided versus the control in the pen trials for white-tailed deer (P # 0.0001); however, we found no difference in seed head damaged between field control plots and plots treated with Liquid Fence or those with Plantskydd (F7,23 = 0.88, P = 0.54). Although milo treated in the pens deterred white-tailed deer, we feel the use of repellents for treating food plots may be cost prohibitive and less effective than other deterrents such as netting fences.
www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife_damage/nwrc/publications/05pubs/arjo052.pdf
Moonbear
#807
Jan30-12, 06:18 PM
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Quote Quote by dlgoff View Post
I can attest from personal experience. Before I started grad school, I worked with white-tailed deer. As side-projects that helped fund some of our primary research, we tested deer repellants. We had deer, they supplied the repellants, and we just had to pick up tasty shrubs from the nursery. None of the so-called repellants worked, and a few seemed to be tasty seasoning to the deer (the plants treated with them got eaten faster than ntreated control plants).
rhody
#808
Jan30-12, 06:26 PM
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Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
I can attest from personal experience. Before I started grad school, I worked with white-tailed deer. As side-projects that helped fund some of our primary research, we tested deer repellants. We had deer, they supplied the repellants, and we just had to pick up tasty shrubs from the nursery. None of the so-called repellants worked, and a few seemed to be tasty seasoning to the deer (the plants treated with them got eaten faster than ntreated control plants).
Sorry guys, what about my homegrown moth ball or human hair use around the garden perimeter ? Could these really work ? How can these companies sell this stuff if it doesn't perform as advertised ?

Rhody...
netgypsy
#809
Jan30-12, 07:17 PM
P: 239
a 10 foot fence uphill with a moat.
dogs loose inside an electric perimeter but you have to fence the garden or the dogs dig it up
horses or goats who like to chase things but you need a really good electric fence around the garden to keep them out.
I've also heard big cat excrement, urine hanging in plastic bags (our zoo does a huge business selling it) and human bodily waste. This came from a guy with a big garden.

You can probably use alternating hot and ground wires and ten foot posts. Be sure your grounds are connected to a real earth ground so they work no matter how dry it is. If I remember correctly in Australia they have to use something like 5 hot and ground alternating because it's so dry. I have to use this technique for horses because sand gets dry so fast. 16 gauge galvanized is really good because if they do crash it, it's cheap and easy to fix and breaks without injuring the animal.

People love deer until they eat their new 50k landscaping, jump through a window and swim in their pool.
Evo
#810
Jan30-12, 07:21 PM
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I remember in upstate NY, I lived in a wooded area. I spent a couple of hundred dollars on annuals for the extensive raised beds I had built thoughout the yard. I finshed planting in one day, exhausted.

Next morning I went out to admire my work and as far as the eye could see, nothing but chewed stumps. RABBITS!!!! I didn't replant. I bought fake flowers.


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