About the protein shape of Covid-19

  • #36
Paul C
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lipid nanoparticle? Any one heard of it ?

Yes. Actually, these are sought in bodily fluid samples in the course of performing a liquid biopsy. Also sought are extracellular DNA and stray parts of the chondriome. They suggest cellular destruction and may carry markers of disease such as infection or metastasis.
 
  • #37
Paul C
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I meant as a prophylactic, there was an article that suggested alcohol inhibits respiratory infection in moderate use.


I heard somewhere that gargling and spitting out an aspirin tablet daily inhibits respiratory infection. No proof of that, or studies I can find, but it's lore and generally as harmless as a daily dram.
 
  • #38
hagopbul
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Mrna-1273 what is this ?
 
  • #39
TeethWhitener
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Mrna-1273 what is this ?
mRNA-1273 is apparently the RNA vaccine that Moderna is working on for this strain of coronavirus. In this case, the RNA codes for the Coronavirus spike protein. When administered, the patient’s body uses the RNA to make the protein, which stimulates the immune response, preventing or mitigating infection.

On a somewhat unrelated note, this thread is all over the place. What exactly is the topic under discussion now?
 
  • #40
jim mcnamara
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@hagopbul started the thread and keeps asking add-on questions. Please create new threads on marginally related questions.

@TeethWhitener 's point is well taken.

The next digression will get the thread closed.
 
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  • #41
hagopbul
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@hagopbul started the thread and keeps asking add-on questions. Please create new threads on marginally related questions.

@TeethWhitener 's point is well taken.

The next digression will get the thread closed.

My first goal of this thread is asking about synthetic methods to create antibodies

My second goal is to stimulate a talking between people and brainstorming

That why I am adding questions one after one in this thread

If it was too much I am sorry
 
  • #42
Ygggdrasil
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Two more structures published, including the structure of ACE2 in complex with the receptor binding domain of the viral spike protein:

Structural basis for the recognition of the SARS-CoV-2 by full-length human ACE2
Yan et al. Science 04 Mar 2020: eabb2762
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2020/03/03/science.abb2762

Structure, function and antigenicity of the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein
Walls et al. Cell doi:10.1016/j.cell.2020.02.058
https://www.cell.com/pb-assets/journals/research/cell/Cell_S0092-8674(20)30262-2.pdf
 
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  • #43
hagopbul
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I should make new thread for this but because I am not an expert in the field with little knowledge in it , I want to share this link with you guys asking about your opinion :

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/new...-project-defines-normal-bacterial-makeup-body

It is a link about human macrobiom project , could this help some how , the idea came to me while I am walking , could human macrobiom be related to Covid-19

Could help cure it ?

Best
Hagop
 
  • #44
fresh_42
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I should make new thread for this but because I am not an expert in the field with little knowledge in it , I want to share this link with you guys asking about your opinion :

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/new...-project-defines-normal-bacterial-makeup-body

It is a link about human macrobiom project , could this help some how , the idea came to me while I am walking , could human macrobiom be related to covid-19

Could help cure it ?

Best
Hagop
This is rather unlikely.

The best news is that China has the most data, excellent scientists, and low hurdles for tests. Together with the fact that many public and private institutions do research as well, and at least the public sector shares its results, we already have the best possible circumstances to find first a therapy, and second a vaccine. I'm sure there is nothing one of us can think of which hasn't already been thought by far more competent people.
 
  • #46
Phil Core
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I am not a molecular genetists. However, via internet, have come across Chinese studies that indicate that the Coronvirus is different and more infectious because of a RNA nucleotide chain at the end - a marker. How hard is it to fashion a reverse RNA nucleotide that would match with the tail and neutralize it?
 
  • #47
Ygggdrasil
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I am not a molecular genetists. However, via internet, have come across Chinese studies that indicate that the Coronvirus is different and more infectious because of a RNA nucleotide chain at the end - a marker. How hard is it to fashion a reverse RNA nucleotide that would match with the tail and neutralize it?

It is possible to target specific RNA sequences using a technique called antisense therapy that is essentially what propose, an complementary RNA molecule that can bind to the RNA and interfere with its function.

However, I am not aware of any studies showing that a certain sequence near the end makes it more infectious. Do you have a link to the Chinese studies where you found this information?
 
  • #48
Phil Core
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Coronavirus Could Be a 'Chimera' of Two Different Viruses, Genome Analysis Suggests
https://www.sciencealert.com/genome...avirus-suggests-two-viruses-may-have-combined
ALEXANDRE HASSANIN, THE CONVERSATION
24 MARCH 2020

This does not mention that the changes are at the end of the RNA change. Do not remember where I picked that up.

I have read so much now that I am unsure where I read everything. There might have been more info some where else.

However, I believe it was some articles that you were mentioning that described the difference in the actual structure of the Coronvisus. These differences have to be RNA/protein relate.

RNA - protein - surface.

Tangential is https://www.foxnews.com/science/the-coronavirus-did-not-escape-from-a-lab-heres-how-we-know

I actually do not think that the "evidence" in the article supports the conclusion of the title. But regardless again there is a difference in the RNA structure of the current virus and others.

I know nothing about nucleotide analysis. How challenging is it to examine a 30,000 RNA chain?

All of the above is meant to direct some reflection as to whether a reverse trans DNA test it the way to go?

Within the week there has be mention of a blood antibody test - https://www.sciencemag.org/news/202...es-could-show-true-scale-coronavirus-pandemic
 
  • #49
Phil Core
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@hagopbul started the thread and keeps asking add-on questions. Please create new threads on marginally related questions.

@TeethWhitener 's point is well taken.

The next digression will get the thread closed.


Please let people say what they feel like they have to say. Others do not have to comment if they do not want to. If others do not comment then the tread is over - simple.
 
  • #50
TeethWhitener
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Please let people say what they feel like they have to say. Others do not have to comment if they do not want to. If others do not comment then the tread is over - simple.
From the terms of service for PF:
“Thread hijacks and off-topic posts:
Do not hijack an existing thread with off-topic comments or questions--start a new thread. Any off-topic posts will be deleted or moved to an appropriate forum per administrator or mentor discretion.”
 
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  • #51
Paul C
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How challenging is it to examine a 30,000 RNA chain?

All of the above is meant to direct some reflection as to whether a reverse trans DNA test it the way to go?

A couple of thoughts.
A full and complete examination of the virus' RNA chain is exhaustive. A 30K base transcriptome offers a vast number of post-translation possibilities, in accord with host cell interactions. It's one thing to count bases or discover and illuminate the function of exon/intron regions, but once proteins are translated, hydrated, and start folding their angles are less straightforward. The nice thing about discoveries in molecular biology is that they come steadily and across disciplines, so an enzyme can be characterized in one species and a similar sequence can be found in an entirely dissimilar species. A chimeric RNA, suggests the article, implies more than one strain became simultaneously able to infect humans from reservoirs in different species. I think this view is overly complicated. Here's what I think happened: Through repeated and chronic exposure to animal virus reservoirs, our human responses to foreign matter withstand innumerable contacts with microorganisms. One occasion, though, a human host for whatever reason responds to viral RNA. Perhaps his cells' polymerase generates a few copies of the virus, a few enzymes, maybe makes it to a Golgi body where it is encapsulated and released. Henceforth, we've a virus that has characteristics amenable to re-enter healthy human cells and begin the cycle again.

On the subject of reverse trans DNA, I believe I heard yesterday this was one method under study, as an antisense marker of known SARS CoV2 sequences. The stereochemistry of such an approach is beyond me, but DNA is well characterized and quite stable as a reagent, so I gather that's a design that holds promise.

I'm wondering what proportion of seropositive Covid-19 patients are actually killed by influenza, and are patients routinely screened for the flu? Because, the threshold for concern with Covid-19 is so low!

Best wishes.
 

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