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Acceleration problems, need help

  1. Aug 26, 2011 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    In 1865, Jules Verne proposed sending men to the Moon by firing a space capsule from a 220-m-long cannon with final speed of 10.97 km/s. What would have been the unrealistically large acceleration experienced by the space travelers during their launch? (A human can stand an acceleration of 15g for a short time.)


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 26, 2011 #2

    Dick

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    Welcome to the forum, but you have to at least try to solve the problem before you can get help. Any formulas you know that you think might apply?
     
  4. Aug 26, 2011 #3
    I dont know any formulas thats why im on the forum, so i can get help and learn the formulas
     
  5. Aug 26, 2011 #4

    Dick

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    Are you studying from a book? Aren't there any formulas in the book related to uniformly accelerated motion? Things like s=(1/2)at^2? Or v0^2-v1^2=2*a*s? Anything along those lines?
     
  6. Aug 26, 2011 #5
    There is no text book. I HAVE NO FORMULAS.
     
  7. Aug 26, 2011 #6

    Dick

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    Is this for a course you are taking? Do you have ANY resources? How are you expected to solve this problem if you don't? Physics Forum Homework Help is not supposed to be a substitute for taking a course of study or reading a book.
     
  8. Aug 27, 2011 #7

    PeterO

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    If you dropped a cannon ball 220m off a cliff, what speed would it get up to, just before hitting the ground, given the acceleration due to gravity is 9.8 m/s^2
     
  9. Aug 27, 2011 #8

    BruceW

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    Dick's right. If this isn't homework, then why have you put it in the homework section?
    Also, we're not allowed to help until you have given an attempt.
    Sorry to be so harsh, but they have rules here, and I don't want to get banned
     
  10. Aug 27, 2011 #9

    Redbelly98

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