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Advanced Higher Physics Investigation

  1. Sep 27, 2007 #1
    As part of my Advanced Higher Physics course I am require to investigate an area of physics not covered by the syllabus. My first thought was to use telron tubes or similar in order to determine the charge to mass ratio of an electron. However it has just come to my attention that this has in fact been added to the course. Does any body have any suggestions for similar areas of investigation?


    As far as I am aware I have to perform three different experiments and assosciated write ups.

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Gizmo
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 27, 2007 #2

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    It would help to know what the syllabus/course does cover.
     
  4. Sep 27, 2007 #3
    Well as far as I am aware the course covers the e/m determination using crossed fields. IF there were any other ways to find this then that would be great but Ive yet to find any.
     
  5. Sep 27, 2007 #4

    dynamicsolo

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    Homework Helper

    If you think you'd like to do charge-to-mass measurements, here's a place to start tracking methods down from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charge-to-mass_ratio . Googling on

    electron experiment "charge-to-mass ratio"

    wll get you a ton of stuff, some of which has useful material on methods.

    As for other areas of investigation, you could look at the Hall Effect. (I think I need to be more awake to come up with some other things you could try that could reasonably be done within a semester lab course.) Do all of your three experiments have to be on related themes? Is this largely an E&M lab course, or do you get into other branches of physics?
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2007
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