Amazing Brain Teaser: Read Mixed Up Words

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In summary, a study at Cambridge University found that the human mind does not read each letter individually, but rather the word as a whole. This explains why we are able to read words even if the letters are jumbled, as long as the first and last letters are in the correct place. This phenomenon is not affected by uncommon words or repeating letters.
  • #1
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Not really a brain teaser but this is totally amazing. I guess most people can read this whole thing as easily if it were written properly.

Taken from http://www.eyetricks.com/wordjumble.htm


"Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe."

Total mind blow. LoL

EDIT:

I found a script that let's you scramble text in the described method. http://www.lerfjhax.com/70.0.html I found that the more uncommon the word, or the more repeating letters it has in it, the more difficult it is to 'read'

Anyway, have fun.
 
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  • #2
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"Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe."

That is quality but is he sentence 'the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae' grammatically correct. Should it not be 'olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer are in the rghit pclae'.?

The Bob (2004 ©)
 
  • #3
The Bob, waht is yuor pnoit?
 
  • #4
No, the Bob, that sentence is grammatically correct.
 
  • #5
Gokul43201 said:
No, the Bob, that sentence is grammatically correct.

Just doesn't sound right. It is plural so needs an 'are' not an 'is'. Never mind. Just my mind again. :smile:

The Bob (2004 ©)
 
  • #6
The Bob is right. That sentence isn't gramatically correct. It should be "the first and last letterS are in the right place".
 
  • #7
The place that you put in an 'are' there was a 'be' in the original sentence, not an 'is'. The root verb 'to be' need not always be expressed as 'is', 'am' or 'are' depending on the plurality or person.

For example, the sentence : "It is important that I/you/they be happy." is perfectly acceptable.
 
  • #8
Gokul43201 said:
The place that you put in an 'are' there was a 'be' in the original sentence, not an 'is'. The root verb 'to be' need not always be expressed as 'is', 'am' or 'are' depending on the plurality or person.

For example, the sentence : "It is important that I/you/they be happy." is perfectly acceptable.

Yes but: 'It is important that I is happy.'
'It is important that you is happy.'
'It is important that they is happy.' are also acceptable in parts of England.

As a side note: can I ask, also, why you are agruing with a Brit? I do speak the language (no hard feelings mind Gokul. You helped me when I started the forums :biggrin: ). Sorry. I don't want to sound mean.

The Bob (2004 ©)
 
  • #9
The Bob, my intention was not to provoke an argument. If that's what I did, I'm sorry.

That said...

Parth Dave : I too noticed the missing plural at the end of "the first and last letter". However, I have come across this usage in several places, and believe it is an elliptic form of "the first (letter) and last letter", which would make it an accepted form of writing, just as "Thank you." is good English, even though this sentence has no subject.
 
  • #10
Gokul43201 said:
The place that you put in an 'are' there was a 'be' in the original sentence, not an 'is'. The root verb 'to be' need not always be expressed as 'is', 'am' or 'are' depending on the plurality or person.

For example, the sentence : "It is important that I/you/they be happy." is perfectly acceptable.

This isn't an issue of plurality, but of voice -I think the predicate phrase is in the passive voice.
Compare "It is important that our needs are satisfied." and "It is important that our needs be satisfied."
One is a situation where the needs are satisfying themselves, while the other is a situation where someone else is satisfying them.
 
  • #11
Hmmm...there does seem to be a subtle difference. But to me it seems like the latter brings to your attention, that which is satisfying them, while the former ignores that aspect.

However, I feel uneasy about using 'are' in the place of 'be' in the original statement, because to me, that removes reference (albeit extremely indirect) to the person that puts in the first and last letters.
 
  • #12
Gokul43201 said:
The Bob, my intention was not to provoke an argument. If that's what I did, I'm sorry.

That said...

Parth Dave : I too noticed the missing plural at the end of "the first and last letter". However, I have come across this usage in several places, and believe it is an elliptic form of "the first (letter) and last letter", which would make it an accepted form of writing, just as "Thank you." is good English, even though this sentence has no subject.

I know it was not to provoke. I am assuming too much. Must stop it. Sorry.

It just doesn't seem right to me that the enlish language would allow this 'the first (letter) and last letter'. But even so I feel as there are two objects (the letters) then it still would be 'are'. I must admit that 'to be' is irregular, not to mention being used in modal verbs. 'Thank you' is more of a developed phrase.

I think the sentence should either be 'the first and last letters are' or the first letter and the last letter are'. As there are more than one object you use the plural verb ending. I can only assume that the writers didn't add the 's' or forgot the 'are'. Either way it is not done English (whether or not in America it is exceptable is another question). I will ask my Dad (he used to be a language teacher) and see what he says. Nothing my luck I will be wrong again .LOL

The Bob (2004 ©)
 
  • #13
Dad is the way to go !
 
  • #14
Gokul43201 said:
Dad is the way to go !

LOL. Indeed he is. I could not have got through german without him.

The Bob (2004 ©)
 
  • #15
Gokul43201 said:
"It is important that I/you/they be happy."

Well it appears that you were correct. I have checked with my dad and he says that it is correct but (and I stress) Not common at all to hear it phrased that way.

Your quote above is correct gramatically (which I agreed with) but it is not the same type of sentence. The original sentence uses the present tense but your sentence (quoted above) uses the (and my dad is not sure but) subjunctive of the verb. Therefore it is no longer an example of the persent tense, which is what the original sentence is. You cannot mix the two together in examples.

However your original point that is it gramatically correct is right. It is just not correct to an English man (like myself) as it isn't how we use the verb.

Never mind. This clears it all up. You win Gokul. :biggrin:

The Bob (2004 ©)
 
  • #16
Ain't no winning allowed here.
 
  • #17
Gokul43201 said:
Ain't no winning allowed here.

Ok. Sorry:redface:

The Bob (2004 ©)
 
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Related to Amazing Brain Teaser: Read Mixed Up Words

1. How does the Amazing Brain Teaser work?

The Amazing Brain Teaser presents a series of words that are jumbled up. Your task is to read each word and rearrange the letters to form a new word. The new word will be related to a specific category or theme.

2. What is the purpose of the Amazing Brain Teaser?

The purpose of the Amazing Brain Teaser is to challenge your brain and improve your problem-solving and critical thinking skills. It also helps to improve your vocabulary and word recognition abilities.

3. Can the Amazing Brain Teaser improve my memory?

Yes, the Amazing Brain Teaser can help improve your memory by engaging your brain in a new and challenging task. It also encourages you to think in different ways, which can strengthen neural connections and improve memory retention.

4. Is the Amazing Brain Teaser suitable for all ages?

The Amazing Brain Teaser is suitable for all ages, although the difficulty level may vary depending on the individual. It can be a fun and educational game for children and a great way for adults to keep their minds sharp.

5. Can I play the Amazing Brain Teaser multiple times?

Yes, the Amazing Brain Teaser can be played multiple times as the words and categories are randomized each time. This ensures a new and unique challenge every time you play.

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