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Applying to physics grad school with MS in chemistry

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  • Thread starter masterfool
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  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

I'm trying to figure a way to get into a physics program, from a less-than-ideal position. I've seen a lot of advice on this forum aimed at college students, which is perfectly reasonable, but unfortunately I don't have a blank slate. Anyway, here's a brief summary of my rotten little CV:
I went to a state university and majored in math with a minor in physics. Physics was always my real passion and I took most of the undergraduate physics courses there. For two years I got decent grades, about a 3.75. After that, I ran into some problems - to make a long story short, my transcript is riddled with c's (including both semesters of mechanics and one of E&M), and I had to withdraw entirely from no less than three semesters for personal reasons. I finished with a 3.06. Convinced I wasn't cut out for physics, I went to a chemistry masters program at a small, uncompetitive local college. I will finish that masters at the end of this year, and it is my ambition to never use it. Presently I'm spending all my spare time catching up on all the things I ought to have learned in school but didn't - but that won't show up on a transcript.
I feel a little daunted by the prospect since I really haven't set myself up very well, but I plan on applying to Ph.D. programs at the end of this year, and I could really use some advice on where to apply, how to present myself, and what to do between now and then to make myself more attractive.
If you've taken the time to read this, I greatly appreciate it.
 

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  • #2
lisab
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Thanks for your advice. That thread, however, is more about whether you should go to a physics grad program, and takes it for granted that you can get into one. I already know I want to, and I really just want to know how to prepare myself.
 
  • #4
ZapperZ
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But the self-test IS a direct test on you finding out what you are lacking, and therefore, allows you to know what you need to prepare yourself for.

Zz.
 

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