Arctan(y)=3x+y how would I go about finding y'?

  • Thread starter IllmicIll
  • Start date
In summary, to find y' in the equation arctan(y)=3x+y, you can differentiate it implicitly using the chain rule. The result will be y'/(1+y^2). However, there should not be two y' in the equation, as shown in the example of y=arccot(x^2).
  • #1
IllmicIll
4
0

Homework Statement



Arctan(y)=3x+y how would I go about finding y'?

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



I tried to start out with...

arctan(y)= tan(x)
tan(x)=3x+y
tan(x)-3x=y

y'=1/(1+x^2) -3

is this correct?
thanks in advance.
 
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  • #2


IllmicIll said:
arctan(y)= tan(x)

How you reached here from
Arctan(y)=3x+y ?

What's
d/dx (Arctan(y)) ?
Use the chain rule.
 
  • #3


How can arctan(y)=tan(x) when your equation says arctan(y)=3x+y?? That's not right. Don't try to solve for y. You can't. Differentiate it implicitly.
 
  • #4


d/dx arctan y

y'/1+y^2*y' ?
 
  • #5


IllmicIll said:
d/dx arctan y

y'/1+y^2*y' ?

Close. But why are there two y' in there? And use parentheses to avoid confusion. There's a difference between 1/1+y^2 and 1/(1+y^2).
 
  • #6


y'/(1+y^2) *y'
I thought the 2nd y' has to be there bc for example
y=arccot(x^2)
x^2=cot y
2x=-csc^2(y) *y'

is that not the case since I already have a y'?
 
  • #7


oops nvm...
 

Related to Arctan(y)=3x+y how would I go about finding y'?

1. What does the equation Arctan(y)=3x+y mean?

The equation Arctan(y)=3x+y is a mathematical expression that relates the inverse tangent of a variable y to the sum of 3x and y. It is a way to represent a relationship between two variables in a mathematical form.

2. Why is finding y' important in this equation?

In this equation, y' represents the derivative of y with respect to x. Finding y' is important because it allows us to understand the rate of change of y with respect to x. This can help us analyze the behavior of the equation and make predictions about its future values.

3. How can I go about finding y' in this equation?

To find y', we can use the implicit differentiation method. This involves taking the derivative of both sides of the equation with respect to x and using the chain rule to simplify the expression. The resulting expression will give us the value of y' in terms of x and y.

4. Can we use any other method to find y' in this equation?

Yes, there are other methods that can be used to find y' in this equation. For example, we can use the inverse function theorem, which states that the derivative of an inverse function is equal to the reciprocal of the derivative of the original function. We can also use the power rule or the quotient rule, depending on the form of the equation.

5. How does finding y' impact the interpretation of this equation?

Finding y' allows us to interpret the equation in terms of its slope or rate of change. For example, if y' is positive, it means that y is increasing with respect to x. If y' is negative, it means that y is decreasing with respect to x. This information can help us understand the behavior of the equation and make predictions about its values.

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