Average surface temperature independent of radiative gasses?

In summary, the conversation discusses the findings of a paper on predicting the temperature of rocky planets using two forcing variables: top-of-the-atmosphere solar irradiance and total surface atmospheric pressure. The missing "forcing" parameter of concentration of greenhouse gases is mentioned, leading to questions about the climate sensitivity for doubling CO2. The paper does not make any claims about causality and instead focuses on the relationship between pressure and kinetic energy.
  • #1
Andre
4,311
74
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0273117715005712

from the abstract:

..Our analysis revealed that GMATs (Global Mean Annual near-surface Temperature) of rocky planets can accurately be predicted over a broad range of atmospheric conditions and radiative regimes only using two forcing variables: top-of-the-atmosphere solar irradiance and total surface atmospheric pressure...

Obviously, the most prominent missing 'forcing' parameter here, is "concentration of greenhouse gasses". There is probably some food for thoughts here, especially when the analysis of Den Volokin and Lark Reliez prove to be robust by independent sources. Would that mean that the climate sensitivity for doubling CO2 is zero?
 
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  • #2
Andre said:
food for thoughts
Yes.
Andre said:
climate sensitivity for doubling CO2 is zero?
Probably not "zero."

Need to play some gas giant games with extinction coefficients (dark depth of atmosphere equivalent to rocky planet surface) and see if this isn't more general than it's presented as being.
 
  • #3
Andre, shame on you.

The paper makes no such claims. Either you haven't read the paper and have misled us to think you had, or you have read the paper and are misleading us as to its contents. In either case, shame on you.

The authors do not claim that the variables in their regression fit are causal, and indeed at the bottom of page 37 they say pretty much the opposite: "Equations (10a), (12) and (13) have one feature in common - they all predict the effect of pressure on a system’s temperature. The presence of such qualitatively similar relations in disparate physical systems can fundamentally be explained by the fact that pressure as a force per unit area represents a key component of kinetic energy (defined as force applied over a unit distance), while temperature is merely a physical manifestation of the available kinetic energy."
 
  • #4
Closed pending moderation.
 

Related to Average surface temperature independent of radiative gasses?

1. What is the concept of average surface temperature independent of radiative gases?

The concept of average surface temperature independent of radiative gases refers to the global average surface temperature of the Earth without taking into account the effects of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, on the Earth's climate. It is used as a baseline measurement to understand the natural variations in the Earth's temperature.

2. How is the average surface temperature independent of radiative gases calculated?

The average surface temperature independent of radiative gases is calculated by taking the average of all the surface temperature measurements taken at different locations on the Earth's surface. This includes land and ocean surface temperatures, and is usually measured in degrees Celsius or Fahrenheit.

3. Why is it important to study the average surface temperature independent of radiative gases?

Studying the average surface temperature independent of radiative gases helps us understand the natural variations in the Earth's temperature and how it has changed over time. It also allows us to determine the extent to which human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels, are contributing to the Earth's warming.

4. What factors can influence the average surface temperature independent of radiative gases?

The average surface temperature independent of radiative gases can be influenced by various factors, including solar activity, volcanic eruptions, El Niño/La Niña events, and changes in the Earth's orbit and tilt. Human activities, such as deforestation and the burning of fossil fuels, can also have an impact on the Earth's temperature.

5. How does the average surface temperature independent of radiative gases differ from the global average surface temperature?

The global average surface temperature takes into account the effects of greenhouse gases, while the average surface temperature independent of radiative gases does not. This means that the global average surface temperature may be higher due to the warming effects of greenhouse gases, while the average surface temperature independent of radiative gases may show a more natural variation in temperature.

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