Battery Operated Cell Phone Charger

In summary, the conversation is about the speaker building their own battery operated cell phone charger and experiencing issues with it not charging their phone. They mention checking the voltage on the USB output port and trying different micro USB chords, but it still doesn't work. They have two theories as to why it may not be working and ask for ideas on how to fix it. Another person suggests measuring the output under load and clarifies that only +5V is needed to charge most Androids. They also ask for more information about the phone, battery, and regulator being used.
  • #1
Physixs
31
0
Hey guys,

I am building my own battery operated cell phone charger. I am pretty sure I built my circuit correctly because the outputs I am reading on my USB output port: pin 1 is 5V and on pin 4 is 0V... which are good readings (and tells me that my voltage regulator is functioning properly and that my ground is connected properly).

When I plug my 'micro USB' chord into my charger to charge my phone, nothing happens.

Any ideas?

I used two different DMMs to check the voltage on the pins in the USB port. Again I am reading 5V on pin 1 and 0V on pin 4. I have tried several different micro USB chords as well. For some reason, my cell phone will not charge off of this.

I have two ideas as to what may be happening...
1. due to the way I hot glue gunned the USB port to the container my circuit is in, there glue may be insulating the voltage from entering my micro USB cable when I plug it in (or the glue is affecting this in some manner)
2. The last i checked this was not true, but just in case... I am not using Pins 2 or 3 (the data pins on the USB) at all because to my knowledge, droids just need 5v on pin 1 and 0v on pin 4 to charge (as opposed to apple devices that requires a data signal in order to charge). Is this the same for droids now too? do you think I have to wire the data pins in?

Any ideas will be a huge help. I am stumped.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Have you tried loading the charger output with something other than the cell phone and/or measuring the output under load (cell phone or other) ?

The big thing is to measure the output under load. Measuring it unloaded is worth doing, but not as significant as the loaded value.
 
  • #3
AFAIK current Androids with USB 2.0 still require only +5V to charge (I have a two-leaded charger and modern phones still charge), the data signal is only needed when you plug it to a computer and the phone shows a message to mount the internal storage/SD card/charge only
Did you measure the USB voltage with the phone plugged in as Phinds stated? Most likely it could drop depending of the maximum power delivered by the circuit and the battery size of your phone (bigger batteries as well as more powerful phones need more amperage, thus power).

Watch the USB OTG pin in your USB lead to avoid entering into OTG mode.

What phone are you using?
What battery and regulator are you using in your charger?
 
Last edited:

Related to Battery Operated Cell Phone Charger

1. How does a battery operated cell phone charger work?

A battery operated cell phone charger works by converting electrical energy from a battery into a usable form of electricity that can charge a cell phone. This is done through a process called voltage conversion, where the charger increases the voltage from the battery to match the voltage needed by the cell phone.

2. What type of batteries are compatible with a battery operated cell phone charger?

Most battery operated cell phone chargers are compatible with standard AA or AAA batteries. However, some chargers may also be compatible with rechargeable batteries such as lithium-ion or nickel-metal hydride batteries. It is important to check the specifications of your charger to ensure compatibility.

3. How long does it take for a battery operated cell phone charger to fully charge a phone?

The charging time for a battery operated cell phone charger can vary depending on the type of battery used, the capacity of the battery, and the phone's battery size. Generally, it can take anywhere from 1-3 hours to fully charge a phone using a battery operated charger.

4. Can a battery operated cell phone charger damage my phone's battery?

No, a battery operated cell phone charger should not damage your phone's battery as long as it is used properly. It is important to use a charger that is compatible with your phone and to follow the manufacturer's instructions for charging. Overcharging or using a low quality charger can potentially damage your phone's battery.

5. Are there any safety precautions to keep in mind when using a battery operated cell phone charger?

Yes, it is important to always use a charger that is compatible with your phone and to follow the manufacturer's instructions for charging. It is also important to use high-quality batteries and to replace them when they become worn or damaged. Additionally, do not expose the charger or batteries to extreme temperatures or water, and always unplug the charger when not in use.

Similar threads

  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
3
Views
966
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
15
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
757
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
11
Views
555
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
18
Views
2K
  • Electromagnetism
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Electromagnetism
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
4
Views
2K
Back
Top