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Quantum Book indication

  1. Aug 20, 2016 #1
    I'm really interested in quantum theory and would like to learn all that I can about it. I'm looking books for learning quantum physics that contains derivation of heisenberg uncertainty principle, dirac notation, pauli matrices, quantum operators, hawking radiation, etc. What are good books to QM along these lines?
     
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  3. Aug 20, 2016 #2

    micromass

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    What's your current math and physics knowledge? Be detailed.
     
  4. Aug 20, 2016 #3
    Well, essentially all I know about physics I learned from "University Physics by Sears, Young", ie I know the basic of all topics on physics.

    On math I learned Calculus 1,2,3,4 by reading "Calculus by James Stewart" and I have some knowledge about basic linear algebra.
     
  5. Aug 21, 2016 #4

    dextercioby

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    Then Zettili, Shankar, Bransden&Joachain or Griffiths wrote textbooks on QM which could suit your level.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2016
  6. Aug 21, 2016 #5

    George Jones

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    Also, "A Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics" by Townsend.
     
  7. Aug 21, 2016 #6
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  8. Aug 21, 2016 #7

    Krylov

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    I was curious why that would be? Is it because one starts with finite dimensional state spaces, thereby avoiding functional analytic complications at first?
     
  9. Aug 21, 2016 #8

    dextercioby

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    The vast majority of textbooks avoid the functional analytical complications altogether, therefore it won't matter how the material is presented. The "spin first" approach was made famous by the late professor J.J. Sakurai in his wonderful book and thus served as inspiration for other book writers.
    Mathematical textbooks on Quantum Mechanics are really very few, I could only mention https://www.amazon.com/Nonrelativis...ords=Capri+non-relativistic+quantum+mechanics and the two-volume book by A. Galindo & P. Pascual https://www.amazon.com/Quantum-Mech...id=1471820798&sr=1-1&keywords=Galindo+Pascual and https://www.amazon.com/Quantum-Mech...id=1471820798&sr=1-2&keywords=Galindo+Pascual
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  10. Aug 22, 2016 #9

    vanhees71

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    In fact, this "spin first" approach was invented by Schwinger in his QM lectures. There's a marvelous book based on them:

    J. J. Schwinger, Quantum Mechanics - Symbolism for atomistic measurements, Springer

    However, it's not following the typical way. So I rather recommend the mentioned book by Sakurai to start with. Nevertheless, the very first chapter of Schwinger's book is just a must-read for anybody interested in the foundations of quantum mechanics!
     
  11. Aug 22, 2016 #10
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