BSc in EE and MSc in Phys?

  • Thread starter Philmac
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  • #1
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I am currently working on an undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering, but I think that for my graduate studies I would like to pursue a masters degree in Physics. Is this possible? My school (University of Waterloo) awards a Bachelor of Applied Science to its engineering graduates, rather than a BEng, just in case that matters.
 

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  • #2
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I know that in my university it is possible to go the other way round. To do a major in physics at the bachelors level and then do an extended (by one year) masters in any discipline of engineering.
 
  • #3
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I'd expect a masters degree in physics to take slightly longer than usual (you'll probably have to make up a few of the upper division undergrad courses that you didn't need for EE), but it should be possible, depending on where you are planning on applying. (I'd expect not to get very far with the top tier schools, but *someone* should let you in.)
 
  • #4
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Philmac: well, you should ask yourself if it's purely for your interests or if you can see any added impact on your career.

I would say that any eng-discipline at whatever level is really good. I would also say that any physicsdegree on whatever level is also good, but you need to either highly specialize in some kind of marketable physics-knowledge to get into a job and industry.

I sense a underlying question " 'ello gents, could I get a highpaying job with dis 'ere degree of EE and some physics? plox halp."

Yes, you can do almost anything with the mathematics knowledge, with your engineering ways to tackle problems and most certainly by having the insight of physics.

If you want a good and specific answer, you must ask a good and specific question. I hope it helped a bit anyways.
 
  • #5
After I saw a guy get his Bachelors in English lit and then get his Masters in Math, I'd have to say most anything is possible. Where there's a will, there's a way, right?
 
  • #6
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After I saw a guy get his Bachelors in English lit and then get his Masters in Math, I'd have to say most anything is possible. Where there's a will, there's a way, right?
Sorry to be off the subject but, how long did it take him to graduate then?
 
  • #7
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I am currently working on an undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering, but I think that for my graduate studies I would like to pursue a masters degree in Physics. Is this possible? My school (University of Waterloo) awards a Bachelor of Applied Science to its engineering graduates, rather than a BEng, just in case that matters.
I'm a third year student at the University of Waterloo in physics and can tell you that as long as your grades are fine you'll have no problem getting accepted. You may be lacking in some coursework areas though... depends on what you're doing.

In fact I know an engineer doing his PhD in physics in the low temp lab.

I'd be more worried for folks like me who will try and get into the EE grad program at UW with a BSc in physics!
 

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