Buck Converter with USB-C output

In summary, using a USB-C to USB-A adapter may not be able to provide the required power levels for your single board computer. A buck converter may be a cheaper option, but may not be as fast.
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gumby4231
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TL;DR Summary
I'm seeing what options are available to power my single board computer.
I have a https://www.lattepanda.com/products/lattepanda-delta-432-with-win10-pro-activated.html single-board computer. For my project, I'd like to power it from a 12V tractor battery if I can. I also have the option of powering it via the JST ph2.0 4P 12V DC connector. I discuss this option with some from the Lattepanda forum here. I'd however like to explore all of my options. Thus I have been looking into the USB-C option. The problem is there doesn't seem to be many regulators with USB-C connectivity that meet it's power requirements (15V 3A).

Testing has shown that the board consumes much less power than this, these are simply the supply Lattepanda officially recommends.

I have found https://www.renesas.com/us/en/products/power-management/battery-management/multiple-cell-battery-chargers/device/ISL95338.html#documents, but it's industrial with a high minimum order quantity(250). It's got a lot of documentation there and the technical language is pretty dense for me as a beginner, so its quite possible I missed some stuff.
I was also considering using a Buck converter with USB output, and then use a USB A to USB-C adapter. This is the best combination I could find (Buck Converter & Adapter). As you'll see, they don't seem to meet my power demands. The buck converter will do 30W at 5V, while the adapter is only capable 2.4A @ 5V.

Does anyone have any recommendations?
 
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gumby4231 said:
Summary:: I'm seeing what options are available to power my single board computer.

I have a https://www.lattepanda.com/products/lattepanda-delta-432-with-win10-pro-activated.html single-board computer. For my project, I'd like to power it from a 12V tractor battery if I can. I also have the option of powering it via the JST ph2.0 4P 12V DC connector. I discuss this option with some from the Lattepanda forum here. I'd however like to explore all of my options. Thus I have been looking into the USB-C option. The problem is there doesn't seem to be many regulators with USB-C connectivity that meet it's power requirements (15V 3A).

Testing has shown that the board consumes much less power than this, these are simply the supply Lattepanda officially recommends.

I have found https://www.renesas.com/us/en/products/power-management/battery-management/multiple-cell-battery-chargers/device/ISL95338.html#documents, but it's industrial with a high minimum order quantity(250). It's got a lot of documentation there and the technical language is pretty dense for me as a beginner, so its quite possible I missed some stuff.
I was also considering using a Buck converter with USB output, and then use a USB A to USB-C adapter. This is the best combination I could find (Buck Converter & Adapter). As you'll see, they don't seem to meet my power demands. The buck converter will do 30W at 5V, while the adapter is only capable 2.4A @ 5V.

Does anyone have any recommendations?
Sorry, I'm no USB expert, but your post is confusing to me.

AFAIK, "USB-C" specifies the connector mechanicals and the data speed, but does not necessarily specify high current capability (I could be wrong about that).

https://www.pcmag.com/how-to/what-is-usb-c-an-explainer

USB 2.0 versus USB 3.0 may specify different current levels (I'm also not sure about that), but I don't think any USB specification will supply the power levels that it sounds like you are wanting at 45 Watts.

Oops, I see that @Baluncore is faster than I am -- I was about to suggest the same thing about using the 12V directly, but maybe with a little noise filtering in addition to the protection recommendations that he posted.
 
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Related to Buck Converter with USB-C output

1. What is a Buck Converter with USB-C output?

A Buck Converter with USB-C output is a type of electronic circuit that converts a higher voltage input to a lower voltage output, while also providing a USB-C port for charging or powering devices. It is commonly used in electronic devices such as smartphones, laptops, and power banks.

2. How does a Buck Converter with USB-C output work?

A Buck Converter with USB-C output works by using a switching regulator to control the flow of electricity and convert the input voltage to a lower output voltage. It uses a series of capacitors, inductors, and diodes to regulate the voltage and provide a stable output.

3. What are the advantages of using a Buck Converter with USB-C output?

One of the main advantages of using a Buck Converter with USB-C output is its high efficiency in converting voltage. It also provides a stable output voltage, which is important for charging and powering electronic devices. Additionally, the USB-C port allows for faster charging and is becoming a standard in many devices.

4. Are there any limitations to using a Buck Converter with USB-C output?

One limitation of using a Buck Converter with USB-C output is that it can only convert voltage from a higher input to a lower output. It cannot be used to step up voltage. Additionally, the circuit may produce electromagnetic interference (EMI) which can affect other electronic devices.

5. How do I choose the right Buck Converter with USB-C output for my device?

When choosing a Buck Converter with USB-C output, it is important to consider the input voltage and current requirements of your device, as well as the desired output voltage. You should also consider the efficiency, size, and cost of the converter. It is recommended to consult with a professional or refer to the device's specifications for guidance.

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