Building a Rube Goldberg Machine Using Analogue Multimeter

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In summary, a Rube Goldberg machine is a complex contraption named after cartoonist Rube Goldberg, that performs a simple task through a series of chain reactions. An analogue multimeter can be used in a Rube Goldberg machine as a switch or trigger to activate other components. It is ideal for this use due to its simplicity, affordability, and ability to measure various electrical properties. When building a Rube Goldberg machine with analogue multimeters, it is important to plan carefully, use simple materials, secure components properly, and be creative. A digital multimeter can also be used as a replacement, but may not have the same visual effect and could be more expensive.
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bobm866
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Hi i need help making my rube goldberg machine. It needs to use an Analogue Multimeter to determine how much water is in a 5 quart pail of ice cream (any amount of water)
The things it needs to have in it is:
1. Needs to start by hitting record button on Digital Camera
2. 1 thing to fly 30 inches or more horizontally
3. needs to act like a roller coaster
4. Use Elastlic Ponetial Engery
5. Uses 2 Electric Motors
6. 1 heat engery with heat source
7. 1 light engery
8. 1 Magnet force
9. 1 pulley system
10. 1 30 inch upward vertical elevation change
It can be 20 steps no more than twenty any suggestions to how i can build this machine the dimensions are 30 inches wide, 36 inches tall and 40 inches long
Thanks
PLEASE HELP
 
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Please don't double-post. Your request is being (somewhat) addressed in the original thread.
 
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Building a Rube Goldberg machine using an analog multimeter is definitely a unique and challenging idea. Here are some suggestions for incorporating the required elements into your machine:

1. To start the machine, you could have a small ball hit the record button on the digital camera, triggering it to start recording.

2. For the 30 inch horizontal flight, you could use a small toy car or train that is powered by one of the electric motors. The car could be launched off a ramp or pushed by a lever to fly the required distance.

3. To create a roller coaster effect, you could use a series of ramps or tracks that the toy car or train travels along, with dips and turns to simulate the motion of a roller coaster.

4. Elastic potential energy can be incorporated by using rubber bands or springs in your machine. For example, you could have a rubber band stretched between two points and when released, it could power a small pulley system or cause a toy car to move.

5. As for the two electric motors, you could use one to power the toy car or train and the other to power a small fan or conveyor belt that moves objects along.

6. For the heat energy, you could use a small candle or tea light to melt a piece of wax that releases a ball or object down a ramp. Alternatively, you could use a small light bulb to generate heat and power a small fan or motor.

7. The light energy could be incorporated by using a small flashlight or LED light that is triggered by a button or switch. This could be used to illuminate a small object or to signal the next step in the machine.

8. To incorporate magnet force, you could use magnets to attract or repel objects in your machine. For example, you could use a magnet to pull a small metal ball along a track or use a magnetic switch to trigger a lever or button.

9. A pulley system can be used to move objects vertically or horizontally. You could use a pulley to lift a small bucket of water or to move a small toy car up a ramp.

10. To achieve the 30 inch vertical elevation change, you could use a series of ramps, levers, and pulleys to lift a small object or toy car to the required height.

As for the dimensions, you may need to adjust the size and placement of your elements to fit within the given space. It may also be helpful to create a rough sketch or blueprint of your machine
 

Related to Building a Rube Goldberg Machine Using Analogue Multimeter

What is a Rube Goldberg machine?

A Rube Goldberg machine is a complex contraption that performs a simple task through a series of chain reactions. It is named after American cartoonist Rube Goldberg who was known for drawing complicated machines to perform simple tasks.

How does an analogue multimeter work in a Rube Goldberg machine?

An analogue multimeter is a device that measures electrical current, voltage, and resistance. In a Rube Goldberg machine, it can be used as a switch or trigger to activate other components. For example, it can be set up to measure the voltage of a battery and when the voltage drops below a certain level, it can trigger a lever to move and release a ball down a ramp.

What are the benefits of using analogue multimeters in a Rube Goldberg machine?

Analogue multimeters are ideal for use in Rube Goldberg machines because they are simple and easy to use, relatively inexpensive, and can measure a variety of electrical properties. They also add a visual element to the machine as the needle moves to indicate changes in the electrical readings.

What are some tips for building a Rube Goldberg machine using analogue multimeters?

Here are some tips for building a successful Rube Goldberg machine using analogue multimeters:

  • Plan out your machine carefully and test each component individually before putting them all together.
  • Use simple and easily accessible materials to construct your machine.
  • Ensure that all components are securely attached and positioned correctly to avoid malfunctions.
  • Be creative and have fun with your design!

Can an analogue multimeter be replaced with a digital multimeter in a Rube Goldberg machine?

Yes, a digital multimeter can be used in place of an analogue multimeter in a Rube Goldberg machine. However, digital multimeters may not provide the same visual effect as analogue multimeters and may be more costly. It is ultimately up to personal preference and the requirements of the machine.

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