C# tutorial for beginning programmer

In summary: In terms of libraries, there are many more C# libraries than Java libraries, but that's to be expected; Java is a much older language. As for which language to start with, that depends on your background and interests. If you have some programming experience but no experience with real languages, I would recommend starting with C#. It's a more modern language and is easier to learn than some of the older languages. But if you're a beginner and only know HTML and CSS, then you should start with those.
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does anyone know a good c# tutorial for some one with only knowledge in css and html
 
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  • #3
thank you
but c# is object orientated and your first link is not about that
 
  • #4
Evenus1 said:
thank you
but c# is object orientated and your first link is not about that
First thing first. You're not going to dive head first into OO C# if all you know is HTML. Which isn't even a programming language, it's markup.
 
  • #5
i know a bit of javascript but have had multiple discussions with my it teacher and he says c# is ok to go straight into
 
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  • #6
C# today is famous, but i were you I would choose other languages (PHP, Java, C). believe me C# is the language that will make you believe "oh it just works, no matter what" is correct.
 
  • #7
what do you mean
 
  • #8
Evenus1 said:
does anyone know a good c# tutorial for some one with only knowledge in css and html

Try these tutorials...

For C# http://csharp.net-informations.com

For CSS http://www.corelangs.com

Watson
 
  • #9
Evenus1 said:
what do you mean
a programmer needs to learn the basics, assembly seems too low (it'll be too complex to deal with advanced topics like threading and event driven stuff), GUI languages are too highly abstract (the programmer will become stupid to really understand what stays behind the scene), so C or the likes is the middle thing to learn and start from, i see why most schools in the world use c as their primary lang of choice in software engineering classes.
Behind php, it's C
Behind C#, it's C
Behind Java, it's C
Behind nodejs, it's C
Behind All Windows DLLs :D it 's C
...
:D
 
  • #10
i meant this bit "believe me C# is the language that will make you believe "oh it just works, no matter what" is correct."
 
  • #12
I have used both Java and C# extensively over the past 15 years, and to me, C# is a cut above Java at this point. C# and Java are very similar, but their is a culture war where people seldom seem to learn both. The virtual machines supporting C# are now faster, and C# has more of an open source credential, than Java. This has reversed from a few years ago,when Java was considered the "open" language. Microsoft also provides a free version of its world-class integrated development environment (Visual Studio Express), and IMO it's a wonderful IDE and probably easier to get around in than the two I've used for Java (Eclipse and Netbeans). So I see no reason for you not to learn C# if that interests you. .NET is pretty cool these days. And if you learn either one, learning the other wouldn't be that difficult.
 
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  • #13
Silicon Waffle said:
C# today is famous, but i were you I would choose other languages (PHP, Java, C). believe me C# is the language that will make you believe "oh it just works, no matter what" is correct.

How does java differ from c# in any way? They are almost identical, even their api is very similar.
 
  • #14
C# is indeed very like Java. Microsoft modeled it after Java, and in fact, since it was created after Java, it improved upon Java in a few ways. Ironically, C# (and the other languages which run on .NET) are nowadays closer to being "open source" and perhaps even cross-platform than Java itself. Java was designed to run on various operation systems, insulated from the OS by its virtual machine. C#.NET also runs on a virtual machine (whose spec is open and standardized, and which is now also available for Linux), but its VM's original design goals were: 1) to support multiple languages (unlike the Java VM which was specifically for Java, at least originally), and 2) to unify all the dozens of versions of Windows so that Windows developers could write programs once which ran on all the various versions of Windows.

As for as the programmer experience, the main difference is the integrated development environment that you choose. Microsoft's IDE (Visual Studio) is world-class; even the free "express" version is quite good. Likewise, there are some very good IDE's for Java; I've used Eclipse and Netbeans, both of which have great features. But Visual Studio is more well-rounded than either of those. (Sorry, I just realized I've repeated here what I said already above).

The programming concepts, libraries and syntax of C# and Java are quite similar. However, nowadays, the latest C# version has been extended to provide functional programming capabilities as well as procedural, so it's a bigger and more complex language, now, even than Java. OTOH, there are extensions that ride on top of Java which also make it very exciting.

Both languages are also very good at multi-threading, which is important in certain applications such as networking or user interfaces.

Learn either one and you won't hurt yourself at all. I'm a bit of a rare bird in that I've used both platforms a fair amount. Like them both!
 
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1. What is C# and why should I learn it?

C# is a modern, object-oriented programming language that was developed by Microsoft. It is widely used for building a variety of software applications, including web and mobile applications. Learning C# can open up many career opportunities in the technology industry and help you become a versatile programmer.

2. Do I need any prior programming experience to learn C#?

No, you do not need any prior programming experience to learn C#. However, having some basic knowledge of programming concepts and logic will make it easier to understand and grasp the language.

3. What are the main features of C#?

C# has numerous features that make it a popular language among developers. Some of its main features include being object-oriented, having a rich standard library, automatic memory management, and support for multiple programming paradigms such as functional programming.

4. How can I start learning C# as a beginner?

The best way to start learning C# is by following a structured tutorial or course. There are many online resources available, such as video tutorials, interactive websites, and books that can help you get started. It is also recommended to practice writing code and solving coding challenges to improve your skills.

5. What are some common applications of C#?

C# can be used to develop a wide range of applications, including desktop software, web and mobile applications, games, and even virtual reality applications. It is also commonly used in backend development for websites and web services.

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