Calculating Chuck Speed for 10mm and 7mm Lathe Spindles

  • Thread starter JamesCalculus
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In summary, the conversation discusses converting cutting speed from m/min to rev/min and rad/s for a spindle of 10mm diameter, and also mentions converting the cutting speed to mm/s for a spindle of 7mm. It also addresses the possibility of misunderstanding the problem and provides a potential solution for converting units.
  • #1
JamesCalculus
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Hi, i would be grateful if anyone could help.
When using a lathe to cut a spindle of 10mm diameter at a cutting speed of 45m/min, how would i convert the 45m/min into rev/min and rad/s?
Also how would i covert the cutting speed of 45m/min into mm/s for a spinde of 7mm?

Thanks :rolleyes:
 
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  • #2
So, the spindle is 10 mm diameter. The circumference is thus 31 mm or 0.031m which is 0.031 m/revolution. Then 45 m/min divided by 0.031 m/revolution gives 1450 rpm. Note that, as your tool goes into the spindle, the surface speed will decrease as the diameter.
 
  • #3
This question is posed rather strangely. The 45 m/min looks like a feed rate. It appears that the OP needs a depth of cut number. I'm probably misunderstanding the problem.
 
  • #4
FredGarvin said:
This question is posed rather strangely. The 45 m/min looks like a feed rate. It appears that the OP needs a depth of cut number. I'm probably misunderstanding the problem.

I think this is just a conversion problem:
1 revolution=2 [itex]\pi[/itex] radians
1 diameter = 2 radians
1 minute = 60 seconds
1 meter = 1000 millimeters

Now, in this problem
1 diameter = 10 mm

So - to get from meters per minute to revolutions per second:
45 meters/minute * (1 minute/60 seconds) * (1000 milimeters/1 meter) * (1 diameter/10 millimeters) * (2 radians/1 diameter) * (1 revolution/ 2 [itex]\pi[/itex] radians)

Each of the fractions is 1, and you should be able to cross off the units. Regrouping gives...
(45 * 1000 * 2) revolution / (60*10*2 [itex]\pi[/itex]) seconds.
 
  • #5
FredGarvin said:
This question is posed rather strangely. The 45 m/min looks like a feed rate. It appears that the OP needs a depth of cut number. I'm probably misunderstanding the problem.

I think (hope) that he was asking for cutting speed in surface m/min cause that's how I answered. It sounds about right for free machining low carbon steel (~150 fpm). OP, help us out. But, yes, he sort of asked it backwards of the way you normally hear it, so I'm not sure.
 

Related to Calculating Chuck Speed for 10mm and 7mm Lathe Spindles

1. How do I calculate the chuck speed for a 10mm lathe spindle?

To calculate the chuck speed for a 10mm lathe spindle, you will need to know the RPM (revolutions per minute) of the spindle and the diameter of the chuck. Then, use the formula: Chuck speed = RPM x π x diameter. Remember to convert the diameter to meters if it is given in millimeters.

2. What is the formula for calculating chuck speed?

The formula for calculating chuck speed is: Chuck speed = RPM x π x diameter. This formula applies to both 10mm and 7mm lathe spindles, as long as you use the appropriate units for the diameter (meters or millimeters).

3. Can I use the same formula for calculating chuck speed for both 10mm and 7mm lathe spindles?

Yes, the formula for calculating chuck speed is the same for both 10mm and 7mm lathe spindles. However, you will need to use the appropriate units for the diameter (meters or millimeters) to get an accurate result.

4. What is the significance of calculating chuck speed for a lathe spindle?

Calculating chuck speed is important for ensuring safe and efficient operation of a lathe machine. It helps determine the appropriate speed for the chuck to rotate at, based on the size and material of the workpiece being machined. This can prevent damage to the machine and ensure a high-quality finished product.

5. Can I use the same formula for calculating chuck speed for different types of lathes?

Yes, the formula for calculating chuck speed can be used for different types of lathes, as long as you use the appropriate units for the spindle RPM and chuck diameter. This formula is applicable for both metal and wood lathes.

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