Calculating Internal Energy at Victoria Falls

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In summary, the conversation discusses the process of calculating internal energy produced per kg as a result of the water falling over Victoria Falls. It is suggested to calculate the mechanical energy converted to internal energy after the water falls and crashes into the rocks or still water. This can be achieved by determining the amount of ordered, macroscopic kinetic energy transformed into disordered microscopic internal energy.
  • #1
mikefitz
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Homework Statement


The water passing over Victoria Falls, located along the Zambezi River on the border of Zimbabwe and Zambia, drops about 105 m. How much internal energy is produced per kg as a result of the fall?


Homework Equations



PE=mgh
KE=mc * deltaT

The Attempt at a Solution



PE=33.0067 u * 9.81 * 105= 33998.55134 J
KE= ??

How do I calculate KE if they don't give me the temp of the water?
To get the IE, do I just add KE and PE?

Thanks
 
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  • #2
I don't see anyone asking you to caculate the rise in temperature (though you could). All you need to figure out is the increase in internal energy. Calculate the amount of mechanical energy converted to internal energy after the water falls. (Hint: What happens to the kinetic energy when the water crashes at the bottom of the falls.)
 
  • #3
Doc Al said:
I don't see anyone asking you to caculate the rise in temperature (though you could). All you need to figure out is the increase in internal energy. Calculate the amount of mechanical energy converted to internal energy after the water falls. (Hint: What happens to the kinetic energy when the water crashes at the bottom of the falls.)

Internal energy is the total energy (the sum of kinetic and potential energies) attributed to the particles of matter.

So wouldn't I have to calculate PE and KE, then add their values to get the total internal energy?
 
  • #4
mikefitz said:
Internal energy is the total energy (the sum of kinetic and potential energies) attributed to the particles of matter.
I think you need to be more precise and distinguish internal energy from macroscopic mechanical energy. Read this: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/thermo/inteng.html"

So wouldn't I have to calculate PE and KE, then add their values to get the total internal energy?
When the water falls and crashes into the rocks (or still water) its ordered, macroscopic KE is transformed into disordered microscopic internal energy. How much KE does 1 kg of water have at the bottom of the falls?
 
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Related to Calculating Internal Energy at Victoria Falls

1. How is internal energy calculated at Victoria Falls?

The internal energy at Victoria Falls can be calculated using the formula U = mgh, where U is the internal energy, m is the mass of the falling water, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and h is the height of the falls.

2. What is the significance of calculating internal energy at Victoria Falls?

Calculating the internal energy at Victoria Falls allows us to understand the amount of potential energy that is being converted into kinetic energy as the water falls. This information can also be used for various energy-related studies and applications.

3. How does the height of the falls affect the internal energy?

The height of the falls directly affects the internal energy as it is a key factor in the calculation formula. The higher the falls, the greater the internal energy.

4. Can the internal energy at Victoria Falls be measured?

Yes, the internal energy at Victoria Falls can be measured using various methods such as using specialized equipment to measure the mass and height of the falling water and calculating the internal energy using the formula U = mgh.

5. Are there any other factors that affect the internal energy at Victoria Falls?

Apart from the height of the falls, other factors that can affect the internal energy at Victoria Falls include the volume and velocity of the water, the distance between the water source and the falls, and the surrounding environmental conditions.

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