Calculating Tension and Acceleration in a Circular Motion

In summary: Would you like me to do that for you?In summary, the problem involves a small ball with a mass of 1.1kg moving on the end of a string with a length of 2.9m. The string is anchored at point A and travels in a horizontal circle at an angle of 36 degrees from the vertical. We are asked to find the string tension, the magnitude of the ball's acceleration, and the time required for the ball to go around the horizontal circle 80 times. To solve this problem, we can use the equations F=ma and v=distance/velocity, but we must first draw a free body diagram and consider the type of motion involved.
  • #1
Bobbie Reidler
2
0

Homework Statement


A small ball with mass m=1.1kg moves on the end of a string with length L=2.9. The string is anchored at point A and travels in a horizontal circle as shown. The string is at and angle of 36 degrees from the vertical.
What is the string tension as the ball swings in this circle?
What is the magnitude of the ball's acceleration?
What is the time required for the ball to go around the horizontal circle 80 times?

Homework Equations


F=ma
v=distance/velocity
?

The Attempt at a Solution


1.1*9.8=10.78 N
 
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  • #2
Bobbie Reidler said:

Homework Statement


A small ball with mass m=1.1kg moves on the end of a string with length L=2.9. The string is anchored at point A and travels in a horizontal circle as shown. The string is at and angle of 36 degrees from the vertical.
What is the string tension as the ball swings in this circle?
What is the magnitude of the ball's acceleration?
What is the time required for the ball to go around the horizontal circle 80 times?

Homework Equations


F=ma
v=distance/velocity
?

The Attempt at a Solution


1.1*9.8=10.78 N
That's not a very ambitious attempt o_O You'll need to show a bit more work, something that pertains to the rest of the problem.

What else have you tried? Did you draw a free body diagram? How does the length of the string fit into the problem? What type of motion is involved? What equations do you know that pertain to that type of motion?
 
  • #3
I really have no idea how to get started? How do I know what to find first?
 
  • #4
Sorry, but we're not going to take you step by step through your homework, doing it for you in the process. You have to bring some effort to the table. You must have similar examples in your course materials or textbook, at least ones that introduce the concepts and equations that are relevant to the problem. You should at the very least be able to post a sketch of the scenario and draw the free body diagram.
 

Related to Calculating Tension and Acceleration in a Circular Motion

1. How do I calculate tension in a circular motion?

In order to calculate tension in a circular motion, you need to know the mass of the object in motion, the radius of the circular path, and the centripetal force acting on the object. You can then use the formula T = mv^2/r, where T is the tension, m is the mass, v is the velocity or speed, and r is the radius.

2. What is the centripetal force and how does it affect tension?

Centripetal force is the force that keeps an object moving in a circular path. It acts towards the center of the circle and is directly proportional to the tension in the string or rope holding the object. This means that as the centripetal force increases, the tension in the string also increases.

3. How do I calculate acceleration in a circular motion?

To calculate acceleration in a circular motion, you can use the formula a = v^2/r, where a is the acceleration, v is the velocity or speed, and r is the radius. This formula is also known as the centripetal acceleration formula.

4. Can tension be greater than the centripetal force in a circular motion?

No, tension cannot be greater than the centripetal force in a circular motion. This is because the centripetal force is responsible for keeping the object moving in a circular path, and if the tension exceeds the centripetal force, the object will break away from its circular motion.

5. How does the mass of the object affect tension and acceleration in a circular motion?

The mass of the object affects tension and acceleration in a circular motion by directly impacting the centripetal force. As the mass increases, the centripetal force required to keep the object in a circular motion also increases, resulting in a higher tension and acceleration. This can be seen in the formula T = mv^2/r, where an increase in mass will lead to a corresponding increase in tension.

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