Can a CS grad get a masters in Mech engineering?

  • #1
I want to study CS, but eventually someday I want to work in the auto industry dealing with robotics and aerodynamics. I was wondering how common is it for a CS grad to get a masters in Mech Engineering?
 

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  • #2
PhanthomJay
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Not very common. Far better to get BSME then MS in grad school, since that is what you want to do. Why CS??
 
  • #3
StatGuy2000
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To the OP:

First of all, you don't have to necessarily have a degree in mechanical engineering to work on robotics or aerodynamics. I can think of a number of scenarios where someone from a computer science background could work on these fields:

1. There is a very close link between machine learning/AI and robotics, so those who, say, have a MS in computer science specializing in, say, machine learning could in fact work in the auto industry focusing on robotics (think self-driving cars, as an example, but that's not the only example). I used to work for an engineering firm specializing in robotics and automation, and I knew a few people with graduate degrees in computer science working alongside the mechanical and electrical engineers.

2. There are computer science graduates who specialize in numerical analysis/scientific computing who work on algorithm development for scientific applications, including aerodynamics, fluid mechanics, etc. I'm not sure how often those in the auto industry would employ people with these backgrounds, but I wouldn't be surprised if there may be a few who do so.

All that being said, if you are primarily interested in robotics and aerodynamics (but with additional interest in software development), you may be better off studying mechanical engineering, and see if you are able to take electives in computer science. Best of both worlds then!

[Aside to the OP: are you from Japan, by any chance? Your handle contains the words "KamenRider" -- Kamen Rider is a popular superhero from Japanese comic books and TV. I lived in Japan as a child and grew up watching the show.]
 
  • #4
To the OP:

First of all, you don't have to necessarily have a degree in mechanical engineering to work on robotics or aerodynamics. I can think of a number of scenarios where someone from a computer science background could work on these fields:

1. There is a very close link between machine learning/AI and robotics, so those who, say, have a MS in computer science specializing in, say, machine learning could in fact work in the auto industry focusing on robotics (think self-driving cars, as an example, but that's not the only example). I used to work for an engineering firm specializing in robotics and automation, and I knew a few people with graduate degrees in computer science working alongside the mechanical and electrical engineers.

2. There are computer science graduates who specialize in numerical analysis/scientific computing who work on algorithm development for scientific applications, including aerodynamics, fluid mechanics, etc. I'm not sure how often those in the auto industry would employ people with these backgrounds, but I wouldn't be surprised if there may be a few who do so.

All that being said, if you are primarily interested in robotics and aerodynamics (but with additional interest in software development), you may be better off studying mechanical engineering, and see if you are able to take electives in computer science. Best of both worlds then!

[Aside to the OP: are you from Japan, by any chance? Your handle contains the words "KamenRider" -- Kamen Rider is a popular superhero from Japanese comic books and TV. I lived in Japan as a child and grew up watching the show.]
Thank you for this answer. Reason why I asked is because there is a college in state that offers "clusters" along with the CS degree ranging from data science, scientific computing, robotics, and aerospace to name a few.

And to answer your question no I'm not from Japan, but I am very familiar with Kamen Rider and watch it constantly (Kamen RIder Ryuki is my favorite one)
 
  • #5
Grinkle
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I want to work in the auto industry dealing with robotics and aerodynamics
What do you want to do with your day as an engineer?

If you want to design mechanical parts and/or define mechanical systems, major in ME and take as many programming electives as you can fit so you can contribute there if you decide you want to or need to.

If you want to write the code that controls already designed mechanical systems, major in CS or EECS and make sure you take embedded programming electives. If you can fit it in, take a dynamics course after you are done with your basic physics courses.

I worked in a start up that did robotic systems for educational institutions early in my career. I am an ME by education. I was a coder / systems integrator for this startup. I'd have been better prepared for that job if I had a degree in EECS. The person in the company who did actual mechanical design was a pure mechanical engineer - not a programmer at all. It takes a village to make a robot.
 

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