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Can the electron go out of the orbital even it is not radiated?

  1. Jun 3, 2007 #1
    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 3, 2007 #2

    G01

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    What do you mean if it is not "radiated?" I don't understand your question.

    The electron can only be in certain different orbitals in the atom. It cannot go out of these specified orbitals unless it is freed from the nucleus by gaining some extra energy from a photon, in which case it still can only move from one allowed orbital to the next until it is free. --Is this what you were looking for??

    Scientist, the questions you post on these forums are way too vague, and sometimes worded incorrectly. You seem to be trying to learn a lot about Physics, which is great, but you aren't going to learn physics by asking vague random questions on this forum. The best you can hope from this forum is to supplement your learning.

    Please buy a book, start from the basics, and then you will be able to ask more detailed, useful questions, using the right terminology, and we will be able to help you all the better.
     
  4. Jun 3, 2007 #3

    ranger

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    You have no idea how many people have offered this advice.
     
  5. Jun 3, 2007 #4
    In my book, there is not texts or paragraphs about atomic particles like electrons ;)
     
  6. Jun 3, 2007 #5

    ranger

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    But you still have to work on expressing your questions in a coherent manner, so that you can receive accurate answers. Use the Thread title to give a hint as to the possible contents of the message; then use the body of the thread to state your problem as clearly as possibly. Otherwise we would have to guess what you mean to ask, as G01 did.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2007
  7. Jun 3, 2007 #6
    maybe he means can the electron go from excited to ground state without radiating energy? or maybe the reverse?:confused:
     
  8. Jun 4, 2007 #7
    I know that the light can excite them and push out of the orbitals, but after exciting them, can the light push them in one correct direction?
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2007
  9. Jun 4, 2007 #8
    Electron absorbs energy (photons) and jump to higher energy level. They can re-emit the absorbed energy and return to ground state.
     
  10. Jun 4, 2007 #9

    ZapperZ

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    You were given OTHER sources for you to read FIRST, such as the Hyperphysics website. Have you tried reading and understanding them before you ask such question? If you have, then point out exactly which part you did not understand. That way we know a more specific aspect that you are having trouble with. If you haven't, why not?

    Zz.
     
  11. Jun 4, 2007 #10

    G01

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    What is your math background? Maybe some of us can suggest a good book?
     
  12. Jun 4, 2007 #11
    can the light push the electrons ?
    like mechanical push?
    like pushing some object in right direction?
     
  13. Jun 4, 2007 #12
    yes light can push things and it can push electrons in free space but it doesn't push electrons in orbitals.
     
  14. Jun 4, 2007 #13
    like pushing some objects with mass (let's say I am pushing ball in certain direction, right?)?
     
  15. Jun 4, 2007 #14

    ZapperZ

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    Look up Compton effect on the hyperphysics site I have given you before.

    Zz.
     
  16. Jun 4, 2007 #15
    like pushing some objects with mass (let's say I am pushing ball in certain direction, right?)?
     
  17. Jun 4, 2007 #16
    an electron has mass doesn't it:confused:
     
  18. Jun 4, 2007 #17
    This just in, elctorons are massless.

    Just kidding :biggrin:
     
  19. Jun 4, 2007 #18
    Yes it have mass, but answer me on my question
    like pushing some objects (let's say I am pushing ball in certain direction, right?)?
     
  20. Jun 4, 2007 #19

    cepheid

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    Hey, man, you're asking a simple Yes/No question, and the answer has already been given to you (yes) along with a resource to find further information on the topic (ZapperZ's suggestion to read up on the Compton effect).
     
  21. Jun 4, 2007 #20
    In free space, right? Can they be excited in free space by the light?
     
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