Centrifugal Force: Are these equal?

In summary, the conversation is about a person seeking help with a problem involving centrifugal force. The problem involves two different equations for calculating centrifugal force and the person is trying to figure out which one is correct. They mention the need for conversion from meters to feet and seconds to minutes.
  • #1
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Good Evening to all,

I have been working on the following problem for the past several days and have finally come to the end of my rope. I hate to admit defeat but I do need some help. I'm almost certain I'm simply missing something that's embarassingly simple...

This is the problem exactly as it appears on the page:

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2. Centrifugal force is given by the following equation:

F = m [tex]\omega[/tex]^2 r

Where F = Centrifugal force
m = mass
[tex]\omega[/tex] = angular velocity
r = length of radius

A student told me the other day that centrifugal force on a mass m kg, rotating at an angular velocity of [tex]\omega[/tex] rpm and at a radius of r feet, is given by the following equation:

F = 3.342 x 10^-3 m [tex]\omega[/tex]^2 r [Newtons]

Are both equations correct? Explain?
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

I know that this means I need to take the F equation, break it down into its base SI units and build it back up taking the meters to feet and seconds to minutes conversion into consideration.
I know that the conversion for meters to feet is 3.28084. What am I missing?
 
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  • #2
Sorry I'd thought I'd manage to find where I was going wrong but apparently not ...
 
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  • #3
F = kg x .10472^2(rad/sec) x .3048(r)
F = 3.34252x10^-3 m w^2 r

It was my conversion directions that was causing all the problems.
 
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Related to Centrifugal Force: Are these equal?

What is centrifugal force?

Centrifugal force is the apparent outward force that is experienced when an object is in circular motion. It is not an actual force, but rather a result of inertia.

What causes centrifugal force?

Centrifugal force is caused by the combination of an object's inertia and its motion in a circular path. In other words, objects naturally want to continue moving in a straight line, and when they are forced into a circular path, this results in the feeling of outward force.

How is centrifugal force different from centripetal force?

Centripetal force is the force that keeps an object moving in a circular path, while centrifugal force is the apparent outward force experienced by the object. These two forces are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction, acting on the same object in circular motion.

Are centrifugal and centripetal forces equal?

Yes, according to Newton's Third Law of Motion, for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. Therefore, the force that keeps an object moving in a circular path (centripetal force) is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the apparent outward force experienced by the object (centrifugal force).

Does centrifugal force actually exist?

No, centrifugal force is not a real force, but rather a result of inertia and circular motion. In reality, objects in circular motion are only experiencing a centripetal force, which keeps them in their circular path.

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