Changing pitch in frequency ratio?

In summary, the problem involves finding the frequency of a string with changing length, using the equation f=1/2L sqroot(t/m). The tension does not affect the frequency and the ratio 4/5 should be read as 4:5. The correct answer is 0.16m and it is important not to overthink simple problems. Happy New Year!
  • #1
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3

Homework Statement


Stupid Problem.JPG


Homework Equations



v=fΛ

v=√(T/μ)

The Attempt at a Solution


I know I'm supposed to make an attempt, but I can make heads nor tails of this. Are they changed in a constant ratioo? Does the tension come into play?

The answer given is 0.16m
 
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  • #2
Mickey Tee said:

Homework Statement


View attachment 771

What's weird too is that they are saying the frequency goes down, but decreasing string length should make the frequency go up...
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
What's weird too is that they are saying the frequency goes down, but decreasing string length should make the frequency go up...
Well, it says the ratio 4/5, which maybe should be read 4:5. It doesn't say "to 4/5".
Mickey, tension doesn't come into it because the tension isn't changing. You quote two equations, one of which is relevant, and gives the right answer.
 
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Likes Mickey Tee
  • #4
Ohh, the only way I was picturing it was the strings being slackened or maybe a reversal of elastic elongation. :P Too much thought into a simple question.
 
  • #5
Mickey Tee said:
Ohh, the only way I was picturing it was the strings being slackened or maybe a reversal of elastic elongation. :P Too much thought into a simple question.
Okay! Yes, it's annoying when you get locked into a misreading like that.
 
  • #6
Thanks!

And by the way, a very happy new year to you haru! :D
May it bring you many new experiences.
 
  • #7
For strings the frequency is given by
f=1/2L sqroot(t/m)

Now f is inversely proportional to length of string

Use this relation to find the answer
 

1. How does changing pitch in frequency ratio affect the sound produced?

Changing the pitch in frequency ratio involves adjusting the frequency of a sound wave, which in turn affects the perceived pitch of the sound. A higher frequency will result in a higher pitch, while a lower frequency will result in a lower pitch.

2. What is the relationship between frequency ratio and musical intervals?

The frequency ratio between two notes is directly related to the interval between those notes. For example, an octave has a frequency ratio of 2:1, meaning the higher note has twice the frequency of the lower note. Similarly, a perfect fifth has a frequency ratio of 3:2.

3. How is pitch in frequency ratio different from pitch in hertz?

Pitch in frequency ratio is a relative measure, while pitch in hertz is an absolute measure. Frequency ratio compares the frequency of one note to another, while hertz measures the frequency of a note in cycles per second.

4. Can changing pitch in frequency ratio be used in music production?

Yes, changing pitch in frequency ratio is commonly used in music production to create different musical effects or to transpose a song to a different key. It can also be used to tune instruments or to create harmonies.

5. What other factors besides frequency ratio can affect the perceived pitch of a sound?

In addition to frequency ratio, other factors that can affect the perceived pitch of a sound include amplitude, timbre, and the listener's perception. For example, a louder sound may be perceived as having a higher pitch, and a sound with a rich timbre may be perceived as having a lower pitch than the same note played on a different instrument.

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