1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Chromium (III) ions and NaOH

  1. Jul 4, 2016 #1

    TT0

    User Avatar

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Screen Shot 2016-07-04 at 2.27.56 PM.png

    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I chose A as after googling, I learnt it was green. My question is: what is the green-blue precipitate. I am inclined to say [Cr(H2O)6]2+ as it's solution is blue, but ions don't precipitate. I tried searching and could find nothing. Could someone tell me what it is?

    Cheers!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 4, 2016 #2

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Why not just a hydroxide?
     
  4. Jul 4, 2016 #3

    TT0

    User Avatar

    I just did further googling and it seems that A is not green according to some and green according to others. I am lost. Chromium (III) is green I think, but in A, C and D, the oxidation number of chromium is also 3. Could you give me some advice?

    Is this for the blue-green precipitate or the green solution?

    Thanks!
     
  5. Jul 4, 2016 #4

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Sorry, that was for the precipitate.

    Cr is amphoteric, dissolution involves OH-.
     
  6. Jul 4, 2016 #5

    TT0

    User Avatar

    So I guess the precipitate is some kind of chromium hydroxide compound (not sure what is the oxidation of chromium is). So I guess that means that the ion causing the green colour has more OH anions than the precipitate. That means A, B and E is not possible. Since NaOH is a base, it doesn't seem the formation of H3O+ is possible so I think the answer is C. My reasoning seems shaky so I could be very wrong. Is C the answer, if so, can you explain your logic so I can learn from it?

    Cheers!
     
  7. Jul 4, 2016 #6

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Oxidation doesn't change, there is no redox going on here.

    As typical with most amphoteric elements, first hydroxide precipitates, then it dissolves in excess OH-. This is awalys a series of reactions of the

    Me(OH)nm + OH- ↔ Me(OH)n+1m-1

    type. One of them contains a neutral hydroxide, typically insoluble. Things get more complicated when you consider water ligands that are present as well (and replaced by OH-), but as a first approximation they can be ignored.
     
  8. Jul 4, 2016 #7

    TT0

    User Avatar

    So will the answer be C as it fits the formula you gave above? Thanks!
     
  9. Jul 23, 2016 #8
    Point one I didnt get this statement from you.

    Ions can't have anions. I think you had a moment of confusion and wrote something else other than what you intended.

    Coming to the question, why don't we use the method of elimination? Since the NaOH is (aq) it can't be a strong enough oxidising agent to oxidise Cr(III) to anything higher, especially Cr(VI). That leaves out B and E as answers.

    Now because we are using basic medium H30+ ions cant originate. that leaves out D as an answer.

    Googling tells me that Cr[(H2O)6]+3 is bluish in color. Puff goes A as an answer.

    Leaves us only with C. And this also makes sense, because in qualitative analysis we place Chromium along with best buddy Aluminium, which forms a similar compound on addition of excess of base.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Chromium (III) ions and NaOH
  1. Dilution of NaOH (Replies: 5)

  2. Aspirin + NaOH => ? (Replies: 9)

  3. NaOH(s) -> NaOH(g) (Replies: 4)

  4. NaOH in HCl (Replies: 14)

Loading...