Circles of Light: Explore the Phenomenon

In summary, The question is about what will be observed when a rotating laser is placed at the center of a circle with a radius of one light second and rotated 360 degrees in one second. The conversation discusses the intensity of the laser's projection on the inner circumference from different points of view, including a stationary observer and an observer rotating with the laser.
  • #1
John Richard
73
0
Hello to whoever is kind enough to read this!

A question,

Suppose I place a rotating laser at the centre a circle so that the beam will hit the inner face of the circles circumference.

If the radius of the circle is one light second, then the circumference would be 2pi light seconds. (We can ignore the length of the laser source device)

If I now rotate the laser through 360 degrees in one second.

What will I see on the circles inner circumference?
 
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  • #2
A projection of the laser sweeping across the circumference with 1/(2pi) original intensity?
 
  • #3
John Richard said:
What will I see on the circles inner circumference?


I think the correct term is "What will you *observe*?" - there is a difference. But that depends on the point of view... If you observe from rest, #1 has given the aswer. But if you observe from a frame that is rotating with the laser, the problem is more subtle, since then you are not in a inertial frame!
 
Last edited:
  • #4
That depends on the point of view!

Lets assume as the viewer you are within touching distance of the circles inner circumference
 

Related to Circles of Light: Explore the Phenomenon

1. What is the concept of Circles of Light?

The concept of Circles of Light is a fascinating phenomenon that occurs when light is refracted through a spherical object, creating a ring of light that appears to surround the object. This effect is often seen in nature, such as when the sun shines through a droplet of water or a spider web, but can also be created artificially using lenses or prisms.

2. How do Circles of Light form?

Circles of Light form when light rays pass through a transparent spherical object, such as a water droplet or a glass sphere. As the light enters and exits the object, it is bent or refracted, causing it to converge and form a ring of light around the object. This effect is similar to how a rainbow is formed, but on a smaller scale.

3. What causes the different colors in Circles of Light?

The different colors in Circles of Light are caused by the refraction of white light, which is made up of all the colors of the rainbow. As the light passes through the spherical object, each color is refracted at a slightly different angle, causing them to separate and create the colorful ring of light.

4. Are there any practical applications for Circles of Light?

While Circles of Light are primarily a natural phenomenon, they have been used in some practical applications. For example, the circular rainbow patterns created by oil spills on water have been used to detect and track the spread of pollutants. Circles of Light have also been used in art and photography to create unique and visually striking images.

5. Can Circles of Light be seen anywhere in the world?

Yes, Circles of Light can be seen in many places around the world. Anywhere that has sunlight, spherical objects, and the right conditions for refraction can potentially produce Circles of Light. However, they are most commonly seen in areas with high humidity, such as rainforests or near bodies of water.

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