Classical radius of nucleons and quarks

hi,

how do you calculate the classical radius of nucleons or quarks? do you include only the electrostatic potential energy or also some nuclear potential energy?. i have read many times that the classical radius of nucleons is lower than the classical radius of the electron, is it right?

thank you for your reply!
 

Meir Achuz

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The "classical radius", usually defined as e^2//mc^2, has no physical significance.
It would be much smaller for a nucleon than an electron, but the physical radius of a
nucleon is almost 1 fm, while the electron physical radius is probably 0.
 

tom.stoer

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For nucleons one can measure form factors (and structure functions); form factors are something like the Fourier transform of the corresponding density (charge, current, ...) so one can measure the radius indirectly via the charge, current, ... distributions
 
The "classical radius", usually defined as e^2//mc^2, has no physical significance.
It would be much smaller for a nucleon than an electron, but the physical radius of a
nucleon is almost 1 fm, while the electron physical radius is probably 0.
thank you, and how does it compare with the photon?
 

Meir Achuz

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A photon is considered a point particle.
 

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