Comparison of Induction Heaters

In summary, the two induction heaters are producing different results with regards to heating a ring shaped object. The coils in each machine have different dimensions and cross-sectional areas, which may be affecting the intensity of the field. The researcher needs to collect data on the size, geometry, and frequency of the coils in order to compare them and determine if they are actually generating the same amount of heat.
  • #1
some bloke
279
98
TL;DR Summary
I have 2 induction heaters which are exhibiting different results when heating the same product. The 2 are different, having different sized coils, and I would like to work out the strength of the induced field in each of them (with a common item being heated) to establish whether they are actually even close to one another.
These are old machines which no-one really understands. This is my first step in trying to understand them better!
As the summary says:
I have 2 induction heaters which are exhibiting different results when heating the same product. The 2 are different, having different sized coils, and I would like to work out the strength of the induced field in each of them (with a common item being heated) to establish whether they are actually even close to one another.

The coil is a single coil, which is aligned perfectly flat. the item being heated is a ring shape, and in theory is a consistent distance from the coil. The coils both have a gap of circa 10mm where they enter and leave, forming the majority of a circle.

The information I am looking for is:

1: What data will I need to collect about the coils? I am assuming:
  • Diameter of the coil
  • thickness of the coil (they have a square cross section)
  • wall thickness of the coil (they are pipes filled with cooling water) to then calculate;
  • Cross sectional area of the coil.
  • Distance from the coil to the ring to be heated (which is inside the coil, in the same orientation; 2 concentric loops)
  • Power inputted into the coil
  • Frequency should be the same as this is relevant to the material to be heated, would this affect the intensity difference if both coils are the same?

2: What formulae do I need to perform this comparison?

I have done some research but nothing seems to quite match what I am trying to establish!

Much Appreciated!
 
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  • #2
I would investigate...
The size and geometry of the coils, which will decide the coupling of the coil to the workpiece.
The frequency of the field, decides skin depth in the heated material.
The impedance matching of the generators to the coils, while the workpiece is present.
The forward power to the coil, while heating.

Are you able to swap the coils between the generators and matching networks?
 
  • #3
I can have a measure of the coils today and get their dimensions, that's no issue.
The frequency (from what I've been told) is the same (I will verify) as this is directly related to the item being heated, which is universal.
Not sure how to measure the impedance matching of the coils, I will need some guidance on that one.
Power to the coil I can get easily enough.

The machines are entirely different makes, so no, unfortunately I cannot swap the coils out.

Ultimately what I need are some equations which I can gather the information for, there's a lot about inductance but nothing about single coils which heat a concentric ring inside them.
 

Related to Comparison of Induction Heaters

1. What is an induction heater?

An induction heater is an electrical device that uses electromagnetic induction to heat conductive materials. It works by creating a high-frequency magnetic field that induces eddy currents in the material, causing it to heat up.

2. How does an induction heater compare to other heating methods?

Compared to other heating methods such as gas or electric heating, induction heaters are more efficient and precise. They heat up materials faster and more evenly, and can be controlled with greater precision.

3. What are the advantages of using an induction heater?

Induction heaters have several advantages, including faster heating times, energy efficiency, and precise temperature control. They also do not require direct contact with the material being heated, reducing the risk of contamination or damage.

4. What types of materials can be heated with an induction heater?

Induction heaters can heat a wide range of conductive materials, including metals, plastics, and glass. However, it is not suitable for heating non-conductive materials such as wood or ceramics.

5. Are there any safety concerns when using an induction heater?

Like any electrical device, there are potential safety hazards when using an induction heater. It is important to follow proper safety precautions and use the device according to the manufacturer's instructions. Additionally, the high temperatures produced by induction heaters can pose a burn risk, so caution should be taken when handling heated materials.

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