• Support PF! Buy your school textbooks, materials and every day products via PF Here!

Compute the electric field in air

  • Thread starter in10sivkid
  • Start date
36
0
hi I don't exactly know how to approach this problem

Compute the electric field in air midway bewteen two point charges of 20*10^-8C and -5*10^-8C seperated by a distance of 10cm

i was thinking of finding V of both the charges and finding the difference between them

so V1 = k(20*10^-8C)/(.1m) - k(-5*-10^-8C)/(.1m)

where k = 9.0*10^9 N*m^2/C^2

then you know V then you can do V/r = E

am i even close???

thanks :)
 

LeonhardEuler

Gold Member
858
1
The [itex]\vec{E}[/itex] field at a point due to multiple charges is the sum of the [itex]\vec{E}[/itex] fields from each charge. You do not have to worry about the voltage. As far as the equation V/r=E, I have never heard of it and I am pretty sure that it can only be valid for point charges or spheres, because otherwise I don't even know what "r" refers to.
 
Last edited:
36
0
ok then...what formula do i use to calculate E fields given this information...thats how i was thinking to get to E using that equation

electric field = voltage/radius = E = V/r by the way
i got it from my professor in lecture
 

OlderDan

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
3,021
1
in10sivkid said:
ok then...what formula do i use to calculate E fields given this information...thats how i was thinking to get to E using that equation

electric field = voltage/radius = E = V/r by the way
i got it from my professor in lecture
In general the relationship between electric potential and electric field is that the change in potential is the work per unit charge to move a charge through an electric field. The customary choice for potential of a point charge is to say the potential is zero infinitely far from the charge. When that choice is made, your equation E = V/r is valid for a single point charge. In your problem, the potential at a point would be the sum of the two potentials from the two charges. If those charges were equal and opposite (they are not in your problem) the potential would be zero midway between them, but the electric field would not be zero. You cannot use E = V/r except for one point charge or a spherically symmetric charge distribution.

What you want to do in your problem is work directly with the electric fields. The electric field from a point charge is the force per unit charge on a test charge used to sample the field. From Coulomb's law this is a vector equal to the Coulomb force on the test charge divided by the test charge. The magnitude is kQ/(r^2) and points toward the charge for negative charges and away from the charge for positive charges. You must add the two vector fields to find the toal field created by the two charges. This is not difficult at the point midway between the two because the field directions are parallel.
 
36
0
ok so would this be good then

i did

(9*10^9 N*M2/C2)(20*10-8 C)/(.05)^2 - (9.0*10^9 N*M2/C2)(-5*10^-8 C)/(.05)^2???
 

Related Threads for: Compute the electric field in air

Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
738
Replies
4
Views
8K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Posted
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
2K

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top