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Converting PSI to force

  1. Jan 30, 2012 #1
    I have a "process" that creates approx. 1.7" of water column throughout a large enclosed surface area, at temperatures ranging from 1500 to 2250 F. I am trying to show the actual force applied to the shell over a large surface area from the known measurment of pressure. For instance, I have 1.7" water column, at 1560 F, in a chamber approx. 15ft x 10ft x 65ft. how can I show the force applied to the entire shell?
     
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  3. Jan 30, 2012 #2

    NUCENG

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    F = P * A
    F Force
    P Pressure
    A Area
     
  4. Jan 30, 2012 #3
    I understand that, what I am trying to understand is, if you have for instance 1 psi in a 12" cube, is the outward exerted force less than that of a 36" cube with 1 psi? It seems that the larger area would have less force than the smaller area at the same pressurization.
     
  5. Jan 30, 2012 #4
    F=P*A

    Take 2D:
    1*(12)^2 = 144 lb of force
    1*(36)^2 = 1296 lb of force

    Pressure is the result of force over an area. If you have more square inches, you need more pounds.

    For 3d just multiply by 6
    12" cube pressurized to 1psi has 864 lb of force.
    36" cube pressurized to 1psi has 7776 lb of force.
     
  6. Jan 30, 2012 #5

    NUCENG

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    Think of a sailboat. A larger sail area produces more force at the same wind speed. Two containers at equal pressure and different surface areas will produce more force on the container with the larger surface area. The pressures (force per unit area) are the same but the areas are different so the total force is different.
     
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