Covelant bonds:why dont the electrons(+) repel eachother?

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what is the explanation for electron pairing in molecules since the electrons are all positively charged? Shouldn't they repel each other?
Any help would be appreciated:) sorry for the newb question :)
 
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  • #2
First, electrons are negatively charged.

Second, the electrons don't really pair with each other, they fill open wells in the orbital space of an atom, and are held in place by attraction to the dense positive charge in the nucleus of the atom.
 
  • #3


Covalent bonds occur when atoms share electrons in order to achieve a stable outer electron configuration. This sharing is based on the principle that opposite charges attract each other. In a covalent bond, the positively charged nuclei of the atoms are attracted to the negatively charged electrons that are shared between them. This attraction overcomes the repulsion between the positively charged nuclei, allowing the atoms to bond.

As for electron pairing in molecules, this occurs because of the principle of electron spin. Electrons have a property called spin, which can be either "up" or "down". In a covalent bond, the electrons are paired up with opposite spins, which allows them to occupy the same orbital and remain stable. This pairing also helps to minimize the repulsion between the electrons, as they are not occupying the same space in the orbital.

So, while it may seem counterintuitive that positively charged particles are able to bond together, the principles of opposite charges attracting and electron spin pairing allow for stable covalent bonds to form.
 

1. Why don't the electrons in a covalent bond repel each other?

Electrons in a covalent bond do not repel each other because they are attracted to the positively charged nuclei of the atoms involved. This attraction overpowers the repulsion between the negatively charged electrons, allowing them to stay bonded.

2. How do covalent bonds form between atoms?

Covalent bonds form when atoms share electrons in order to achieve a more stable electron configuration. The shared electrons are attracted to the positively charged nuclei of both atoms, creating a strong bond.

3. Can covalent bonds form between atoms of different elements?

Yes, covalent bonds can form between atoms of different elements. As long as the atoms have similar electronegativity values, they can share electrons and form a covalent bond.

4. What is the difference between a single, double, and triple covalent bond?

The difference between a single, double, and triple covalent bond is the number of shared electrons between the atoms. A single bond involves the sharing of one pair of electrons, a double bond involves the sharing of two pairs of electrons, and a triple bond involves the sharing of three pairs of electrons.

5. Can a covalent bond be broken?

Yes, a covalent bond can be broken. This can occur through a chemical reaction or by applying energy to the bond. When a covalent bond is broken, the shared electrons are either redistributed to form new bonds or released as free electrons.

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