Create Heat Through Repeated Collision

  • Thread starter g124v17y
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Does anyone know of a metal and catalyst or two metals that when collide create a great amount of heat? For example, iron filled hand warmers get warmer when you shake them, but I am looking for temperatures enough to bake with, so up to about 400 degrees F. I am thinking about filling a container with shavings of metal x and putting a solid ball of metal y in with it, and shaking the container to create the heat desired.

Possible?
 

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  • #2
Q_Goest
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Hi g124, welcome to the board. It sounds like you want to have heat generated by the mechanical action of shaking or impact as opposed to a chemical means. If that's the case, then there is no way to do what you're asking for and there's a simple reason why. For a device that doesn't change chemical composition and only has the energy input from a person shaking their hands, all the energy to heat the mass has to come from the energy input which is the shaking motion. That shaking motion doesn't represent any more heat than what you get rubbing your hands together, so 400 F isn't going to happen without a hell of a lot of hand shaking.
 
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I see what you are saying, but I was hoping that a chemical reaction between two metals could be used to create heat. Are there no chemicals that when collide create heat? Thermite? Common hand warmers? The shaking would just be the kinetic catalyst to the chemical reaction, much like spinning the steel wheel against the stationary flint in a lighter.
 
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Q_Goest
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I'm sure there are but I'm not a chemist.
 
  • #5
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I see what you are saying, but I was hoping that a chemical reaction between two metals could be used to create heat. Are there no chemicals that when collide create heat? Thermite? Common hand warmers? The shaking would just be the kinetic catalyst to the chemical reaction, much like spinning the steel wheel against the stationary flint in a lighter.
A chemical reaction producing heat isn't the same as two metals colliding and producing heat.

I think you mean you want two metals that react when they come in contact and generate the required heat.

Don't even attempt thermite. It's far hotter than you need and extremely dangerous - not to mention the speed of the reaction.

You'd be better off making a camp fire.
 
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Yes! thats exactly what I mean.... should i post this in a chemistry forum? lol
 
  • #7
Q_Goest
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That might be a better place for it.
 

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