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Damped harmonic oscillation

  1. Nov 29, 2008 #1
    I am not sure that I understand what damped harmonic oscillation is different from simple harmonic oscillation, can someone please explain that to me? I read wikipedia and still doesn't get it...
     
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  3. Nov 29, 2008 #2

    Hootenanny

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    An simple harmonic oscillator is a harmonic oscillator where the only force acting on it is the restoring force. A damped harmonic oscillator on the other hand, has an additional damping or frictional force, such as drag, acting on it.
     
  4. Nov 29, 2008 #3
    so therefore in a damped harmonic oscillation the oscillation will eventually stop because of the friction? in theory...
     
  5. Nov 29, 2008 #4

    Hootenanny

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    Eventually, yes. Unless of course it is a driven, damped oscillator, that is the case when there is some external periodic force applied.
     
  6. Nov 29, 2008 #5
    hmm..well I am actually doing this experiment and I can get the friction of the oscilattion really2 small.. however my TA's said to put magnets on top of the oscillation object, do you know why?
     
  7. Nov 29, 2008 #6

    Hootenanny

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    Perhaps if you described the apparatus, I could be of more help.
     
  8. Nov 29, 2008 #7
    well I am using an air tracks and on top of it I have a glider. It says that magnets are use to create the damping force . A moving magnet creates an induced current in nearby conductors, in this case the air track. This induced current creates a magnetic field that opposes the motion of the original magnet.
     
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