Deciding aerospace as my course

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hey, guys!
im thinking of taking aerospace (or aeronautical) engineering as my course.
but..can someone help me?
need some info on the course..
mayB info about aerospace would be helpful
jz to make sure i take the right course:biggrin:
 

Answers and Replies

469
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This is the Penn State Undergraduate Major entry for Aerospace Engineering:

This major emphasizes the analysis, design, and operation of aircraft and spacecraft. Students learn the theories and practices in the fundamental subjects of aeronautics, astronautics, aerodynamics and fluid dynamics, aerospace materials and structures, dynamics and automatic control, aircraft stability and control and/or orbital and attitude dynamics and control, air-breathing and rocket propulsion, aircraft systems design and /or spacecraft systems design. All of these place significant weight on the development and use of teamwork and communications skills for effective problem-solving. Graduates in aerospace engineering find employment in the customary settings such as government laboratories, large and small aerospace firms, and in nontraditional positions that also require the use of systems-engineering approaches to problem-solving; they can also pursue graduate study in aerospace engineering and related fields.

Graduates with a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering will be able to:

1. analyze the dynamics and control characteristics of aerospace vehicles, including the basic translational and rotational dynamics, and the basic theory and practice used to control these motions,
2. analyze fluid dynamics, including the regimes of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows, inviscid and viscous flows, and laminar and turbulent flows,
3. apply knowledge of the fundamentals of aeronautics, including aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft, propulsion systems, airplane performance, and elementary aircraft stability and control,
4. apply knowledge of the fundamentals of astronautics, including orbital mechanics, attitude dynamics and control, rocket propulsion, and the space environment,
5. predict performance, and conduct preliminary design, of gas turbine and rocket-based propulsion systems and their components,
6. analyze the detailed dynamics, stability, and control of either aircraft or spacecraft,
7. analyze and design structural elements such as bars, beams, plates, and thin-walled structures,
8. make measurements to test hypotheses or to characterize the performance of physical systems (aerodynamic, structural, and control), and analyze and interpret the data in written reports,
9. complete the successive stages of conceptual, preliminary, and detailed design of an aircraft or spacecraft mission and the associated vehicles,
10. function effectively on teams to solve problems in complex aerospace systems that require knowledge of multiple disciplines,
11. apply an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility to realistic situations,
12. make effective oral and written presentations in a format appropriate for the setting,
13. explain how this profession affects society as a whole, and to demonstrate an appreciation of how technical issues guide societal actions,
14. demonstrate an awareness of the need to stay abreast of technical developments throughout their working careers, and demonstrate that they are able to maintain and extend their learning, and
15. make appropriate and effective use of computer software, hardware, and state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation.
 
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thnks!!

oh, i see.
can ask u?
is aerospace a new course?
 
FredGarvin
Science Advisor
5,050
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Hardly. It has been around almost as long as aircraft have.
 
5
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hrmm...since i mayB taking aeronautical course, hopefully someone could give me a bit of the picture or experience in studying this course.

whats the interesting part of aeronautical?

how tough is it as they say aeronautical engineering (well, mostly all type of engineering are tough, right? hehe) ?

the duration?

working life?

ok..i asked too much. hehe!!

hope of continuous guidance..
 
24
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well all the engineering courses are hard, but I feel aero gets a particularly hard time of it. as in, while aero's are working, the mech-eng's are usually partying. just my observations of course.
 
533
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Shouldnt this be in career guidence.

The study of aerodynamics goes back even before the wright brothers flight, right up to da vinci's sketches and the invention of the hot air balloon
 
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What Uni are you think of???
 
laurelelizabeth
well all the engineering courses are hard, but I feel aero gets a particularly hard time of it. as in, while aero's are working, the mech-eng's are usually partying. just my observations of course.
oh:frown: do you mean 7 days a week? just eat, sleep and study? that doesn't sound healthy
 
It's a major which will keep challenging you, so you need a lot of motivation. :) I've done a few other majors, so I know from first hand experience what the difference between aerospace and other majors is. Motivation (and a set of healthy brains) is all you need.

Each year in Holland there are less students of technical majors. Even though the salaries don't seem to change at all, at least it means you can work at any place of your choosing.

Where do you live anyway? Most technical majors are good, so it just depends on what your interested in, and how much you are willing to do. :) Like, the guys at civil engineering will never go as far as aerospace students in math/physics/mech, etc.
 
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