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Deciding Factors

  1. Dec 20, 2004 #1

    Cod

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    I'm currently a sophomore in college and still have not declared a major to pursue. The problem is that I cannot decide which factors in my decision making should bare the most importance in my final decision. There are so many things in life that interest me; however, a lot of the things that interest me are things that I'm not too good at. Basically, what I'm saying is, should I weight my decision more on what I'm interested in or put more emphasis on what I'm good at?

    Just one example is my great interest in computers (security, research, etc.); however, I'm not very good even after I gain knowledge. On the other side of the spectrum, I'm a great salesperson. But it is something that really doesn't interest me much beyond what I already know.


    Any help is greatly appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 20, 2004 #2

    cronxeh

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    Ok answer these questions:
    1. Where would you like to work in 5 years?
    2. How much would you like to make per year?
    3. What interests you technically - making things or using things
    4. How far are you willing to go in educational persuits (e.g. how long you willing to spend in school and in further training/education after you graduate)
    5. What are your strenghts (e.g. sciences or math or liberal arts or business)
     
  4. Dec 20, 2004 #3

    Cod

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    My answers as of today, December 20:

    1) Haven't really thought about specific companies
    2) At least 50k per year (US Dollars)
    3) Making things
    4) I'll pursue educational aspects as far as I need to and more
    5) Marketing, Advertisement, Basic Science, Basic Mathematics, Bartending :smile:
     
  5. Dec 20, 2004 #4
    Being good at sales will usually give you a higher ceiling in terms of salary versus a person with good technical skills. Senior people at firms (like CEO's or managing directors or law firm partners for example) tend to spend a good portion of their time trying to bring in new business - and it's often the main reason for them being promoted to that position to start with.

    So - I'd look at an MBA or something like that. Then get a management job in an industry that interests you, like the computer industry.
     
  6. Dec 20, 2004 #5

    cronxeh

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    I think what you are looking for is a career in engineering. A degree in engineering will give you a problem solving set of mind, or in your case an opportunity to see what your client needs (doing consulting work). You should check out these careers:

    Chemical Engineering (you will be able to go into marketing, sales, law and even medical school after this one) - requires math proficiency, love for chemistry, physics, and lately biochemistry and genetics. Check out this link for more info - http://www1.cems.umn.edu/orgs/aiche/archive/history/h_whatis.html [Broken] and http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos029.htm

    Mechanical Engineering - anything that moves, produces power or uses heat. This profession is very broad, yet not as highly technical as other engineering fields. It has a bit of every engineering field. More info here - http://www.eng.fsu.edu/general/department_ppt/mechanical%20A.ppt [Broken] and http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos033.htm


    All engineers (except for civil - they start from around 41k) make around 50k a year from start. As you progress (in 5-10 years) you can expect to make anywhere from 70 to 80k and beyond that could even go over 100k/yr. All of these fields use computers at their workplace. But the end result is a product - you are always making things
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 1, 2017
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