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Diagrams of topological terms

  1. Jan 11, 2010 #1
    Hi Guy's
    I am just starting out in topology and I was wondering if someone might know of a good link that may have venn diagrams of some important topological terms ie closure of A, int A, limit points etc.

    regards
    Brendan
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 11, 2010 #2

    HallsofIvy

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    I can't imagine Venn diagrams as being a good way to keep those straight. They would get much too complicated. Just learn the definitions.
     
  4. Jan 11, 2010 #3
    For A = (0,1). a limit point P of A is that P is a point such that every open set around it contains at least one point of A different from P.

    So for this example 0 and 1 would be limits points of A although they are not in A, and there would be infinitley many limits points of A.

    So if I take 0 which is not an element of A and an open set around it (0-e,0+e) the point 0+e is in A and is not equal to 0. hence a limit point
    The same would be for 1.

    Take 1 which is not an element of A and an open set around it (e-1,1+e) the point e-1 is in A and is not equal to 1.
     
  5. Jan 11, 2010 #4
    If I have [tex]X = (- \infty,0] \cap [1,\infty +)[/tex] and [tex] A \subset X = (0,1)[/tex]

    would A = (0,1) be the interior of A and the closure of A = [tex]X\bar{A}[/tex]?
     
  6. Jan 12, 2010 #5

    HallsofIvy

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    This makes no sense. They way you have defined X, it is the empty set- there is NO real number that is in both [itex](-\infty, 0][/itex] and [itex][1, +\infty)[/itex], those two sets are disjoint. At first I thought you meant "[itex]\cup[/itex]" rather than "[itex]\cap[/itex] but the rest would still make no sense. You have defined X as "all real numbers except (0, 1) so "[itex]A\subset X= (0, 1)[/itex]" is nonsense. With either [itex]cup[/itex] or [itex]cap[/itex], X is NOT equal to (0, 1). If you mean A= (0, 1), then A is not a subset of X. If you meant "[itex]\cap[/itex]", X is empty and has only itself as subset. If you meant [itex]\cup[/itex], A is, in fact, the complement of X.

    If A is (0, 1) as a subset of the real numbers, with the usual topology, then its interior is (0, 1) (A is open) and its closure is [0, 1]. If you meant X as the underlying set with the topology inherited from the real numbers, whether you meant "[itex]\cap[/itex]" or "[itex]\cup[/itex]", A is not a subset of X.
     
  7. Jan 12, 2010 #6
    Thanks for you reply I see where I stuffed up. I did mean...
    [tex]X= R[/tex]
    [tex]A \subset X \mid x\in (0,1)[/tex]


    If A is (0, 1) as a subset of the real numbers, with the usual topology, then its interior is (0, 1) (A is open) and its closure is [0, 1].

    I was confused how the closure of A was [0,1] then I re-read the definition in my text.

    It says.

    A point x is in the closure of [tex]A[/tex] if for each neighbourhood [tex]N[/tex] of x [tex]N \cap A = \emptyset[/tex]


    So if I take x=0 which is not an element of A and an neighbourhood N around it say (0-e,0+e) the point [tex]0+ \eps \in A \cap N [/tex] the same would be for N = (1-e,1+e) [tex]1- \eps \in A \cap N [/tex]


    regards
     
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