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Difficult sequence problem

  • Thread starter david18
  • Start date
49
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1. Homework Statement

A sequence of terms U1, U2, U3, ... is defined by Un = 5n + 20

If the sum of the first N terms of the sequence defined above equals the sum of the first kN natural numbers, show that:

N = 45 - k / k^2 - 5

2. Homework Equations

Sum of first N natural numbers = N(N+1)/2

Sum of sequence = N(50+(N-1)5)/2 (knowing that a=25, d=5)

3. The Attempt at a Solution

I put the substituted kN into N in the equation N(N+1)/2 to give me kN(kN+1)/2.

I then made kN(kN+1)/2 = N(50+(N-1)5)/2 and solved from there which eventually got me to:

k^2N^2 + kN = 50N + 5N^2 -5

(I then divided both sides by N as N is always positive)

N = 45 +5N -k / k^2

...the +5N makes it wrong. I dont know where I've gone wrong, any help would be appreciated.
1. Homework Statement



2. Homework Equations



3. The Attempt at a Solution
 

Answers and Replies

144
0
Your last expression is right, the only thing you need to do is solve for N.
 
454
0
1. Homework Statement

k^2N^2 + kN = 50N + 5N^2 -5
This one should be k^2N^2 + kN = 50N + 5N^2 -5N, but I suppose this was an inconsequential typo.

(I then divided both sides by N as N is always positive)

N = 45 +5N -k / k^2
Dividing by N is OK, but this is not the result. Just divide the above with N (all the terms contain N so this is easy), and then group terms with and without N.
 

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