Discharging argon gas with a homemade tesla coil

In summary, a Tesla coil can be used to discharge Argon gas. It is important to have a strong electric field to do so.
  • #1
patric44
296
39
hello guys
i made a small crude tesla coil ( slayer exiter ) and i tried it on multiple gas tubes that i had
and i have been able to discharge neon , argon



but i have a question : how strong the electric field needed to discharge argon gas ?
 
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  • #2
We use argon as a sputtering background gas and 'ignite' it with a combination of RF, a filament glowing like an incadescent light bulb but with about 400 volts of bias applied to the filament. Between the three, we get 'ignition'. In the presence of just RF, there is an alternate method: in the first method, the gas pressure has to be around 4 millitorr minimum, we use between 5 and 10 millitorr usually. But another sputtering tool uses the alternate method, that is it boosts the argon pressure up to about 20 millitorr for a brief period in the presence of an RF field, that gets it going also.
Argon is like a molectular bead blaster (sand blaster) and the RF is applied to the 'target' which is the stuff we want to sputter and coat onto a substrate. In our case, aluminum, silicon dioxide (glass), silicon Carbide, and silicon chrome, all for different effects, some for power conducting lines, others for resistive values, others for insulation or a hard coating for wear resistance. But all get their little molecules or atoms knocked off the target by the combined effect of the plasma of Argon which makes a cloud of the target stuff which coats a substrate passing in front in a back and forth sweeping action. We apply coatings from 300 Angstroms thick to 20,000 Angstroms (2 microns). You are doing it with just ultra high voltage. You will find you can do it with a lot less voltage than that from a Tesla coil. Like I said, our bias is only a few hundred volts. Remember the old Neon lights? The tiny bulb ones fire at around 100 volts or less.
 

Related to Discharging argon gas with a homemade tesla coil

What is a homemade tesla coil?

A homemade tesla coil is an electrical resonant transformer circuit invented by Nikola Tesla in the late 1800s. It is used to produce high-voltage, low-current, high-frequency alternating-current electricity. It consists of a primary coil, a secondary coil, and a capacitor.

How does a homemade tesla coil discharge argon gas?

A homemade tesla coil can discharge argon gas by using the high-voltage, high-frequency electricity produced by the coil to create an electrical arc between the tesla coil and the argon gas. This arc ionizes the argon gas, causing it to emit a bright purple glow.

Is it safe to discharge argon gas with a homemade tesla coil?

Discharging argon gas with a homemade tesla coil can be dangerous if proper safety precautions are not taken. The high voltage and frequency can cause electrical shocks, and the argon gas can be harmful if inhaled. It is important to use caution and follow safety guidelines when experimenting with a homemade tesla coil.

What materials do I need to discharge argon gas with a homemade tesla coil?

You will need a homemade tesla coil, a source of high-voltage and high-frequency electricity, a container of argon gas, a grounding wire, and safety equipment such as goggles and gloves. It is also recommended to have a fire extinguisher nearby in case of any accidents.

What are some potential uses for discharging argon gas with a homemade tesla coil?

Some potential uses for discharging argon gas with a homemade tesla coil include creating unique light displays or art installations, conducting experiments on gas ionization, and demonstrating the principles of electricity and magnetism. However, it is important to always use caution and follow safety guidelines when using a homemade tesla coil for any purpose.

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