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Does electrons fall out when a current carrying wire is cut

  1. Feb 1, 2010 #1
    does electrons fall out when a current carrying wire is cut

    well i know it doesnt make much sense n also doesnt have ny effect

    but still does it happen or not ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2010 #2

    Lok

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    Re: electricity

    No they don't, they are cofined to the area around the metal atoms. Unless some form of energy is given they cannot escape from there.

    :)))))))
     
  4. Feb 6, 2010 #3
    Re: electricity

    but then they have some momentum associated with them . where does that energy goes?
    is it invested in the form of radiations??

    does heisnbergs uncertanity principal has to do nything with this>>??
     
  5. Feb 6, 2010 #4

    Lok

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    Re: electricity

    An electron is very light (google it) and the speed is very small (1-2m/s) depending on wire, so the momentum energy would be very small. Not that it matters as these things do not work this way.

    If there is momentum then it's just not enough to push electrons out of the wire and all the energy will be transformed too heat.
     
  6. Feb 6, 2010 #5
    Re: electricity

    The energy could come from the inductance or capacitance of the system, if high enough.

    EG:



    Also, if a wire is hot enough to reach the work function (energy needed to free the electrons), the electrons can flow freely from the wire, as in the case of hot filaments.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  7. Feb 7, 2010 #6

    Lok

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    Re: electricity

    The flow has to come out of a cut wire... usually they are not hot enough. Capacitance of a wire is very low and the same applies for it's inductance unless it is inside a coil.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  8. Feb 7, 2010 #7
    Re: electricity

    thanks buddies
     
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