Electric Field Intensity: Intersecting E-fields Explained

In summary, the conversation discusses the intersection of electric field lines and vectors in the context of Coulomb's law. The book being referenced is not mentioned.
  • #1
SHASHWAT PRATAP SING
119
13
IMG-20210404-WA0002.jpg

This the photo of my textbook, Here In the derivation of Electric Field Intensity due to an infinitely long straight uniformly charged wire -
In the figure 1(c).20 Vector E1 and vector E2 are electric fields at point P due to the two line elements as shown in the figure 1(c).20.
But, in this figure 1(c).20 two Electric field lines are shown intersecting PE1 and PE2, how can this be done as we know that Two electric field lines never intersect each other then how are they intersecting here...

If anyone wants to know what electric field lines are you can go here-
https://byjus.com/physics/electric-field-lines/

please help me...
 
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  • #2
The two angled lines that appear to be intersecting add together to give E that points straight up.
 
  • #3
If there are charges at ##P_1## and ##P_2##, then they both contribute to the electric field everywhere, including at point ##P##. Using Coulomb's law. Right?
 
  • #4
PeroK said:
If there are charges at ##P_1## and ##P_2##, then they both contribute to the electric field everywhere, including at point ##P##. Using Coulomb's law. Right?
Yes.
But, the Electric Field Lines can never intersect each other, then why they are intersecting it here.
 
  • #5
SHASHWAT PRATAP SING said:
Yes.
But, the Electric Field Lines can never intersect each other, then why they are intersecting it here.
You need to think about things more. "Electric field lines can never intersect". What does that mean?
 
  • #6
  • #8
PeroK said:
I'm asking you to think about what you're saying.
Perok, see the figure 1(c).20,
The Electric field lines PE1 and PE2 due to the two line elements are intersecting but how can these electric field lines intersect, as we know that electric field lines do not intersect each other.

I have no idea what's happening here please help me...
 
  • #9
SHASHWAT PRATAP SING said:
Perok, see the figure 1(c).20,
The Electric field lines PE1 and PE2 due to the two line elements are intersecting but how can these electric field lines intersect, as we know that electric field lines do not intersect each other.

I have no idea what's happening here please help me...
Okay, I'll give you a mutiple choice:

a) Electric field lines can intersect.
b) Those lines in your book are not electric field lines.
c) The electric field lines from two different electric fields can intersect.
 
  • #10
PeroK said:
Okay, I'll give you a mutiple choice:

a) Electric field lines can intersect.
b) Those lines in your book are not electric field lines.
c) The electric field lines from two different electric fields can intersect.
I guess maybe option (B)...
but if they are not electric field lines then what are they...
 
  • #11
SHASHWAT PRATAP SING said:
I guess maybe option (B)...
but if they are not electric field lines then what are they...
We could go with that answer. Now that you don't have a fundamental objection to Coulomb's law, what happens when you apply it in this case?
 
  • Skeptical
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  • #12
PS the first paragraph spells out what's happening. It's the vector addition of the electric fields associated with different charges.
 
  • #13
PeroK said:
PS the first paragraph spells out what's happening. It's the vector addition of the electric fields associated with different charges.
Perok, can you please explain in detail I am not able to understand...
 
  • #14
SHASHWAT PRATAP SING said:
I am not able to understand...

I'm not surprised, since you are answering him so quickly there is hardly enough time to type, let alone think.
 
  • #15
SHASHWAT PRATAP SING said:
Perok, can you please explain in detail I am not able to understand...
It's 1) Coulomb's law; and 2) the vector addition of electric fields.

If that's a problem, then the material is too advanced and you need to take a step back and revise the basics.
 
  • #16
PeroK said:
It's 1) Coulomb's law; and 2) the vector addition of electric fields.

If that's a problem, then the material is too advanced and you need to take a step back and revise the basics.
No, perok that's not the problem.
I just wanted a detailed explination.
But, Really Thanks for your help..

The Electric Field lines cannot intersect each othe but the Electric Field vector can intersect each other. That is what happening here...
 
  • #17
SHASHWAT PRATAP SING said:
View attachment 280905
This the photo of my textbook, Here In the derivation of Electric Field Intensity due to an infinitely long straight uniformly charged wire -
In the figure 1(c).20 Vector E1 and vector E2 are electric fields at point P due to the two line elements as shown in the figure 1(c).20.
But, in this figure 1(c).20 two Electric field lines are shown intersecting PE1 and PE2, how can this be done as we know that Two electric field lines never intersect each other then how are they intersecting here...

If anyone wants to know what electric field lines are you can go here-
https://byjus.com/physics/electric-field-lines/

please help me...
Please can you tell me the book name am
 

Related to Electric Field Intensity: Intersecting E-fields Explained

1. What is electric field intensity?

Electric field intensity is a measure of the strength of an electric field at a specific point. It is represented by the symbol E and is measured in volts per meter (V/m).

2. How is electric field intensity calculated?

Electric field intensity is calculated by dividing the force exerted on a test charge by the magnitude of the charge. It can also be calculated by dividing the voltage difference between two points by the distance between those points.

3. What is the relationship between intersecting electric fields and electric field intensity?

When two or more electric fields intersect, the resulting electric field intensity at the point of intersection is the vector sum of the individual electric field intensities. This means that the electric field intensity at the point of intersection will be stronger than the individual electric fields.

4. How does the direction of intersecting electric fields affect electric field intensity?

The direction of intersecting electric fields can either add to or cancel out each other, depending on their relative direction. If the electric fields are in the same direction, they will add together to create a stronger electric field intensity. If they are in opposite directions, they will cancel each other out and result in a weaker electric field intensity.

5. What are some real-world applications of intersecting electric fields and electric field intensity?

Intersecting electric fields and electric field intensity are used in a variety of applications, including particle accelerators, capacitors, and electronic devices such as televisions and computer screens. They are also important in understanding and studying the behavior of charged particles and electric fields in nature.

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