Emissivity e varies with zenith angle according to e = E*cos(theta)

  • Thread starter Callisto
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  • #1
Callisto
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If the emissivity e varies with zenith angle according to e = E*cos(theta) where E is the emissivity normal to the surface. Would this surface be an isotropic source of radiation?

Well, since e varies with angle then the flux density must vary accordingly so the surface would radiate anistropically.

Anybody disagree?
Callisto
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
selfAdjoint
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This cosine law is like the one for intensity of incoming solar radiation, and that's a cylinder, so I agree, anisotropic.
 
  • #3
Bystander
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"Anisotropic" for a point on a surface; integrate intensity at any point above an infinite plane surface, and it's isotropic.
 

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