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English math books

  1. May 18, 2007 #1

    disregardthat

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    Hi, I am interested in knowing what the names of the english math books are for the school you begin on when you are 15-16 years old. By the way, how many years does that school last?
     
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  3. May 18, 2007 #2
    Depends on the country. In Western Australia (math capital of the world), a few text books have been written specifically for the syllabus. Calculus by OT Lee and Calculus by AJ Sadler. Find them on eBay.
    Alternatively, you can do chapter 1 of undergraduate calculus books.
     
  4. May 18, 2007 #3

    Kurdt

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    At 15-16 in England you will be starting your A-levels or finishing your GCSE's. If its A-levels you are talking about then they take 2 years and as far as books go, most are written specifically for the A-Level content. The following link has details of books published by Heinemann for both GCSE and A-level courses.

    http://www.harcourt.co.uk/FEAndVocational/Mathematics/Mathematics.aspx

    If you wanted a specific book then I'm afraid you'll have to elaborate more.
     
  5. May 18, 2007 #4

    disregardthat

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    Thank you. I was not after a specific book, because I do not know any names of them yet. I have heard of something called "further math". Is this mathematics at a higher level than A-level?
    And one more thing: How long does the A-levels last?

    Thanks for the link,

    "Heinemann Higher Mathematics " I assume it is for A-levels? I am wondering of buying it. Do you think it was good? It says "Higher Maths". What is that? And is it for 1, or two year period? Sorry for asking so many questions, but a person who knows the answer shouldn't be bothered much.. Thanks
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2007
  6. May 18, 2007 #5

    Kurdt

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    The A-level takes 2 years to complete. It was originally split around the year 2000 into and AS-level which is the first year and the full A-level is gained after the second year, so you could do half an A-level for whatever purpose that served. I think that the second year maths books have been relabeled as further maths whereas previously they were sequentially numbered.

    I have no idea why they did this as it just seems like a lot of hassle for no obvious gain. If you can describe the book further then I might know what it is you're after. you can also try searching for further maths on the web site I linked to before as they publish most of the maths texts for A-level.
     
  7. May 18, 2007 #6

    disregardthat

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    Thanks, it is all quite confusing. This book I found, via your link was called "Heinemann Higher Mathematics". Link: http://www.harcourt.co.uk/Series/Se...erMathematics/HeinemannHigherMathematics.aspx

    I got a good impression of it. But what is the difference between this book, and this: http://www.harcourt.co.uk/Series/Se...nModularMathematicsForEdexcelASAndALevel.aspx

    Is GCSE the exam for secondary school?
    Is AQA the exam for A-level school?

    Just to get it strait: When you complete the school you are on from a child to around 15-16 you start on A-Level school, where the AS-Level is the first year, and the A-level is gained after completing two years. After that you go to university or something. Is that correct?

    If you know anything of this: http://www.harcourt.co.uk/Series/Se...ndEdition/AdvancingMathsForAQA2ndEdition.aspx What do you think of it?
     
  8. May 18, 2007 #7

    cristo

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    The first link appears to be higher maths for the scottish exams, whereas the second is a book for maths AS and A level

    Yes, GCSE stands for general certificate of secondary education, and is obtained at the end of high school
    Not quite; AQA is an exam board-- i.e. the people who administer the exam-- there are various exam boards, each which result in an AS or A level qualification. After school in england, people go to college, for two years, and sit the AS and A levels in respective years. After that, if you want to stay in education, you would go to university for 3 or 4 years (or more) depending upon the course you undertake.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2007
  9. May 20, 2007 #8
    This is not correct.

    You can take a year of Maths, leading to an AS in Maths.
    If you decide to do a second year after that, you get a full A-level in Maths.

    Alternatively, you can take the whole of the Maths A-level in one year.
    In the second year you can then take the "Further Maths" A-level, which is (generally) harder than the Maths A-level.

    You must take 3 modules for an AS, or 6 modules for the complete A-level.

    What exam board you choose makes a difference to what modules you can choose, and in what order you do them. The most popular exam board for Maths is Edexcel.

    I am taking Edexcel Further Maths, having done the Maths A-level last year. In the first year I took the modules: Core 1, Core 2, Core 3, Core 4, Mechanics 1, Statistics 1. This year I have taken Further Pure 1, Further Pure 2, Further Pure 3, Mechanics 2, Statistics 2, Mechanics 3. However, this is only what I have taken - although there are some compulsory modules - C1,C2,C3,C4,FP1, and either FP2/FP3 - many of them are chosen from a range of options.

    If you want any clarification on this, please ask. :smile:
     
  10. May 20, 2007 #9

    Kurdt

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    Well they've obviously changed it again since I did mine where you could only do the 3 modules in a year and had to do the AS before going onto the A-level. I wish they'd leave things alone.

    Thanks for the clarification :smile:
     
  11. May 20, 2007 #10

    cristo

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    Of course, different exam boards may have different rules. Although I think I recall my school teaching a level maths in first year, and a level futher in second year (I didnt do further maths though, so am not really sure).

    I'm glad they've changed what used to be called "pure" modules into "core" modules. When I came to university and saw that I had a "foundations of pure maths" class in my first semester I was there expecting calculus, but instead got taught combinatorics and set theory.. etc-- "real" pure maths!
     
  12. May 23, 2007 #11

    disregardthat

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    Thanks for the information.

    Do you think any of the books I mentioned is capable of homestudies?

    To be honest, the norwegian level of knowledge in school is very poor. We are learning things 2-3 years later than you...
     
  13. May 23, 2007 #12

    Kurdt

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    The books are organised very well and the course is modular so you should have no trouble using them to homeschool. Of course you have the wonderful resource of PF as well to help you. :smile:

    Also the exam boards offer lots of resources such as full specifications and lots of past exam papers with mark schemes on their websites.
     
  14. May 23, 2007 #13

    disregardthat

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    Hehe, PF always keep good care of its members :smile:

    I guess i'll buy one of them then.
     
  15. Jul 2, 2007 #14

    disregardthat

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    I know it's been a while since I posted this topic, but I think it's better to revive it than to make another one.

    I have some questions to what you wrote:
    In the first year of the A-levels, as I assume is called AS now, what choices do you have for choosing mathcourses? What is the hardest, and what book did you use for that course.

    In the second year, what courses could you choose from within mathematics, and again, what was the hardest course, and what book did you use?

    What is these modules you talk about?
     
  16. Jul 4, 2007 #15
    I shall try and answer your questions in as much detail as I can, but please remember that everything I say is specific to the EDEXCEL exam board. Every exam board offers a Maths A-level, and they are all equivalent in difficulty, but sometimes differ in content slightly. (Do note, however, that Edexcel is the most popular exam board for Maths)
    I personally studied for an A-level in Maths and an A-level in Further Maths. (So two A-levels in total) Students normally take 4 or 5 AS levels in their first year, and then 3 or 4 A2 in their second year, but there are exceptions (I took 5A2). If you are very interested in Maths then I would recommend taking both Maths and Further Maths, especially if you want to study Maths, Physics, or a similar subject at university.

    Remember that an AS is half an A-level. If you study the AS *and* the A2 part then you get a full A-level. An AS contains 3 modules. An A2 contains 3 modules. So, in total, you need to take 6 modules for each A-level.

    So, for my two A-levels, in Maths and Further Maths:

    First Year
    Core 1
    Core 2
    Core 3
    Core 4
    Statistics 1
    Statistics 2

    C1, C2 and S1 were examined in January.
    C3, C4 and S2 were examined in May/June.

    Second Year

    Further Pure 1
    Further Pure 2
    Further Pure 3
    Mechanics 1
    Mechanics 2
    Mechanics 3

    FP1, M1, M2 were examined in January.
    FP2, FP3, M3 were examined in June.


    Every textbook that I used was part of the "Heinemann Modular Mathematics for Edexcel AS & A Level" series.

    eg.
    Core 1

    Overall: I found the hardest module in the first year to be C4. I found the hardest module in the second year to be either FP2 or FP3. (FP2 covers integration, hyperbolic functions, and conic sections; FP3 covers matrices / vectors / complex numbers / series / numerical methods / proof)

    Now the hard part: what modules you *can* do.

    In the normal Maths A-level you *must* have C1-C4. Then you can choose any of these following combinations: (M1, M2); (M1, S1); (M1, D1); (S1, D1); (S1, S2); (D1, D2).

    In the Further Maths A-level you *must* have FP1 and either FP2 or FP3 (or both!). If you take FP1+FP2+FP3, you need to take three other applied modules. If you take FP1+FP2 or FP1+FP3 then you need four other applied modules. The applied modules go up to M5, S4, and D2. Note that you cannot put the same module in both Maths in Further Maths. (So, in total, you should have finished *12* modules)
     
  17. Jul 4, 2007 #16

    disregardthat

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    Thank you so much. This was very helpful. I appriciate it.

    Wow, this shows SOME difference between Great Britan and Norway! At the age of 18/19 we are introduced to for example the carthesian coordinate system, as well as three dimensional vectorcoordinates and excact values of some trigonometric values. You learn this when you are 15/16, that's disturbing.
     
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