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Enthalpy of Vaporization vs. Latent heat of vaporization

  1. Oct 19, 2012 #1
    I am having confusion with the difference between these two, or are they synonymous terms?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 19, 2012 #2
    They are synonymous terns.
     
  4. Oct 19, 2012 #3

    morrobay

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    Enthalpy of vaporization is the heat , calories/gram, absorbed during phase change from liquid to gas.
    For example the heat water at 100 C absorbs going to steam at 100 C
    Latent heat of vaporization , usually called latent heat of fusion, is that quantity
    of heat released during condensation. The phase change back to a liquid at 100 C from gas at 100 C.
     
  5. Oct 19, 2012 #4
    The term "fusion" is reserved for the melting of a substance from solid to liquid. That's the definition of the word fusion.
     
  6. Oct 20, 2012 #5

    morrobay

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    I should have said latent heat of condensation then. The key word here is latent, and from my 1A and 1B chemistry classes
    it applies when heat previously absorbed during phase change : solid to liquid and
    liquid to gas is released in the reverse.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2012
  7. Oct 20, 2012 #6
    Except for the words "usually called latent heat of fusion", I like the wording in your previous posting much better, particularly your definition of latent heat of vaporization. Of course, quantitatively, the latent heat of vaporization is exactly equal in magnitude to the enthalpy (change) of vaporization.

    Chet
     
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