Expanding monotomic gas

In summary, we have a monatomic gas with 5.00 moles and an initial temperature of 127C. It expands, absorbing 1220 J of heat and doing 2180 J of work. The change in internal energy is -960 J. We are asked to find the final temperature T_final using the ideal gas constant R = 8.3145 J/mol/K. By using the equation Q = ΔU + W and the knowledge of how internal energy is distributed in an ideal gas, we can calculate the final temperature.
  • #1
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We start with 5.00 moles of an ideal monatomic gas with an initial temperature of 127C. The gas expands and, in the process, absorbs an amount of heat equal to 1220 J and does an amount of work equal to 2180 J.

I fouind out the change in U, which is -960. I'm just not sure how to calculate Q. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
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  • #2
~angel~ said:
We start with 5.00 moles of an ideal monatomic gas with an initial temperature of 127C. The gas expands and, in the process, absorbs an amount of heat equal to 1220 J and does an amount of work equal to 2180 J.

I fouind out the change in U, which is -960. I'm just not sure how to calculate Q. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I don't understand the question. Why isn't Q the heat absorbed that you were given?
 
  • #3
Sorry, I forgot to ask the question (I just copied and pasted it).

The question is:

What is the final temperature T_final of the gas?
Use R = 8.3145 J/mol/K for the ideal gas constant.
 
  • #4
Use [itex]Q = \Delta U + W[/itex].
 
  • #5
~angel~ said:
Sorry, I forgot to ask the question (I just copied and pasted it).

The question is:

What is the final temperature T_final of the gas?
Use R = 8.3145 J/mol/K for the ideal gas constant.

You should be able to calculate the initial internal energy of the gas, given that you know the termperature, how much gas you have, and that it is ideal monatomic. You know how much internal energy was lost in the process, so you know the final internal energy, from which you can calculate the final temperature. Look for the discussion in your text or notes about how internal energy in an ideal gas is distributed.
 

1. What is an expanding monotomic gas?

An expanding monotomic gas is a gas made up of single atoms that are expanding or increasing in volume due to an increase in temperature or a decrease in pressure.

2. How does the expansion of a monotomic gas occur?

The expansion of a monotomic gas occurs when the atoms in the gas gain energy and move faster, causing them to collide with each other and the walls of their container, thus increasing the volume of the gas.

3. What is the relationship between temperature and the expansion of a monotomic gas?

As the temperature of a monotomic gas increases, the atoms within the gas gain more kinetic energy and move faster, leading to an increase in their volume and expansion of the gas.

4. How does the pressure of a monotomic gas affect its expansion?

The pressure of a monotomic gas is directly related to its volume, according to the ideal gas law. As the pressure decreases, the volume of the gas increases, leading to expansion.

5. What are some real-world applications of expanding monotomic gas?

One example of a real-world application of expanding monotomic gas is in refrigeration systems, where expanding gases are used to cool down the surrounding environment. Expanding monotomic gases are also used in aerosol cans, where they expand to push out the product from the can. Additionally, the concept of expanding monotomic gas is important in understanding the behavior of gases in various scientific fields such as thermodynamics and atmospheric science.

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