Explaining Electromagnetic Fields: Mass and Distance

In summary, the conversation is about someone looking for a simple explanation for the interaction between two permanent magnets at a distance. They ask if sub-atomic particles from one magnet can interact with the other magnet's particles at a distance, and if all atoms have particles that interact at such a distance. The answer is available on Wikipedia, where it is explained that virtual particles do exist and have mass according to the current model/theory.
  • #1
Tim Edilation
19
0
I have skimmed relevant links in wikipedia, and some external links regarding electromagnetic fields, but would like a simple (I'm no physicist) answer to the following question that I have.

When one, for example, takes two strong permanent magnets and aligns so that there is repulsive/or attractive force at sometimes a surprising large distance, is there really sub-atomic particles from one magnet flitting about so far away from the magnet that it interacts with the other magnet's flitting about 'particles'. Do all atoms have 'particles' flitting about that far from the atom ?
According to the current model/theory do these things/particles have mass ? Thanks
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #3
Thanks
 

1. What is an electromagnetic field?

An electromagnetic field is a physical field that is created by electrically charged particles. It is a type of energy that is present in and around all objects that have a charge.

2. How does mass affect electromagnetic fields?

Mass does not directly affect electromagnetic fields. However, mass is related to electric charge, which is the source of electromagnetic fields. Objects with more mass may have a higher electric charge, which can result in a stronger electromagnetic field.

3. What is the relationship between distance and electromagnetic fields?

The strength of an electromagnetic field decreases as distance from the source increases. This is known as the inverse square law, which states that the intensity of an electromagnetic field is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the source.

4. Can electromagnetic fields be shielded?

Yes, electromagnetic fields can be shielded by certain materials, such as metal. This is because these materials can absorb or redirect the electromagnetic energy, reducing its strength. However, no material can completely block all electromagnetic fields.

5. Why are electromagnetic fields important?

Electromagnetic fields play a crucial role in our daily lives. They are responsible for the functioning of electronic devices, communication systems, and many other technologies. They also play a vital role in the natural world, such as the Earth's magnetic field, which protects us from harmful solar radiation.

Similar threads

  • Quantum Physics
Replies
8
Views
829
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
29
Views
2K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
10
Views
2K
Replies
13
Views
2K
  • Classical Physics
Replies
8
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
931
  • Quantum Physics
2
Replies
36
Views
1K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
8
Views
782
Replies
1
Views
762
Replies
2
Views
540
Back
Top