Exploring the Relationship Between Amplitude and Time in a Pendulum Clock

In summary: I could come up with for now.If the amplitude decreases while I 'm watching, the clock will be worthless, since it will probably come to a halt before it's wound up again.Yes.
  • #1
arhzz
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52
Homework Statement
You found an old pendulum clock in the attic and are estatic

a)What should you do if the clock runs too fast?
b) You notice that the amplitudes decrease over time. Does that change anything in the clock's timing?
c) Now start playing and try to halve the pendulum frequency. How do you do that exactly?
Relevant Equations
None
Hello!

So we are given this very interesting physics question, that we should only discuss and not do any calculations.

So for a) I've though this if the clock is running too fast,the way to adjust this would be to lengthen the pendelum length,my logic behind this the longer the pendelum the more time it needs to actually move, thus reducing the clock time

b) Here it says "the amplitudes decrease over time", the way I interprate this that the pendelum is moving "less" meaning its path from left to right is getting shorter. Now I wouldn't say that this affects the time of the clock, and if it would I'd reckon that time would be running slower.

c) So here we need to halve the frequence, now the way I would do it is to simply increase the length of the pendulum, to be exact take 4 times the length to reduce the frequence by half.

What do you guys think to my logic? What would you do diffrently

Thank you
 
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  • #2
arhzz said:
lengthen the pendelum length,my logic behind this the longer the pendelum the more time it needs to actually move, thus reducing the clock time
Yes.
arhzz said:
I wouldn't say that this affects the time of the clock, and if it would I'd reckon that time would be running slower.
As long as the amplitude is fairly small to begin with, that is correct. But it is not truly SHM; at larger amplitudes the period does change a bit. Which way, I forget.
arhzz said:
increase the length of the pendulum, to be exact take 4 times the length to reduce the frequence by half.
Yes.
 
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  • #3
arhzz said:
b) Here it says "the amplitudes decrease over time", the way I interpret this that the pendelum is moving "less" meaning its path from left to right is getting shorter.
Correct
Now I wouldn't say that this affects the time of the clock,
It does. The restoring force is less than proportional to the deviation from vertical, so the period increases (slightly) with amplitude. Conversely, if its amplitude becomes smaller and it was correct before, it will be going too fast with a smaller amplitude.
and if it would I'd reckon that time would be running slower.
Time runs at its own pace, always :smile:
 
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  • #4
BvU said:
Correct
It does. The restoring force is less than proportional to the deviation from vertical, so the period increases (slightly) with amplitude. Conversely, if its amplitude becomes smaller and it was correct before, it will be going too fast with a smaller amplitude.
Time runs at its own pace, always :smile:
Okay, so the smaller the amplituted the faster the clock will tick (that is what i meant by "time of clock" poor choice of words).

Thank you for your help (both of you)!
 
  • #6
haruspex said:
Yes, but that might be marked as wrong.
As I posted, constant period is a good approximation as long as the initial amplitude is not too great. See https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pendulum#Period_of_oscillation for details.
Hmm I see, that is a bit tricky, especially since no values are given. I'll check with my professor and than I'll be able to come to a final decision. Thank you for your help!
 
  • #7
haruspex said:
Yes, but that might be marked as wrong.
As I posted, constant period is a good approximation as long as the initial amplitude is not too great. See https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pendulum#Period_of_oscillation for details.
There is some ambiguity in the problem statement. If I adjust a clock so that it runs correctly at an amplitue A, then come back six months later and see that the amplitude is, e.g. 0.5 A, the clock will be going too fast.

If the amplitude decreases while I 'm watching, the clock will be worthless, since it will probably come to a halt before it's wound up again.
 
  • #8
BvU said:
There is some ambiguity in the problem statement. If I adjust a clock so that it runs correctly at an amplitue A, then come back six months later and see that the amplitude is, e.g. 0.5 A, the clock will be going too fast.

If the amplitude decreases while I 'm watching, the clock will be worthless, since it will probably come to a halt before it's wound up again.
That is what my thought process is also, I think what we are susposed to take from this question is the relationship of time and amplitude. I have not heared back from my professor for confirmation.
 

Related to Exploring the Relationship Between Amplitude and Time in a Pendulum Clock

What is a pendulum clock?

A pendulum clock is a type of clock that uses a swinging pendulum to keep time. It was invented in the 17th century and was widely used until the invention of the quartz clock in the 20th century.

How does a pendulum clock work?

A pendulum clock works by using the natural swinging motion of a pendulum to regulate the movement of the clock's gears. As the pendulum swings back and forth, it causes the gears to move, which in turn moves the clock's hands.

What type of pendulum is best for a pendulum clock?

The best type of pendulum for a pendulum clock is a simple pendulum, which consists of a weight suspended from a string or rod. The length of the pendulum is an important factor in keeping accurate time, as it determines the speed at which the pendulum swings.

How do I set up a pendulum clock?

To set up a pendulum clock, first make sure the clock is level and stable on a flat surface. Then, hang the pendulum from the suspension spring, making sure it is centered and not touching anything. Finally, set the clock to the correct time and start the pendulum swinging.

How do I maintain a pendulum clock?

To maintain a pendulum clock, it is important to keep it clean and well-oiled. The pendulum should also be checked regularly to ensure it is swinging at the correct speed. If the clock starts to lose time, the pendulum may need to be adjusted or the clock may need to be serviced by a professional.

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