Exploring Time Dilation: A Layman's Perspective

In summary, according to a video I watched recently, time allegedly runs a tad slower in places on the Earth where the magnetic field is stronger. No doubt that has been tested and confirmed by atomic clock experiments.. to my simple mind that just suggests a timing error caused by the difference in gravitational strength causes the clock to run slower rather than time itself, in which case atomic clocks should merely include a gravimeter to measure the gravity at the clocks location to offset the error rather than it leading to such fantastical notions of time travel.
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paul1365
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TL;DR Summary
Why are atomic clocks regarded as a constant by some?
According to a video I watched recently 'time' allegedly runs a tad slower in places on the Earth where the magnetic field is stronger. No doubt that has been tested and confirmed by atomic clock experiments.. to my simple mind that just suggests a timing error caused by the difference in gravitational strength causes the clock to run slower rather than time itself, in which case atomic clocks should merely include a gravimeter to measure the gravity at the clocks location to offset the error rather than it leading to such fantastical notions of time travel.

The twins paradox is also widely accepted as fact. but I've always struggled with that notion, I suspect a similar error caused by the speed of the object containing the atomic clock causes the photons being measured to have to travel a longer path and because the speed of light is fixed the photons have to slow down... but according to everyone this somehow equates to time itself slowing down rather than it being clock error.
For me this 'dilation' is just error and physicists...(or maybe its just the documentary producers) are looking at it from the wrong angle but I'm just an average Joe... can someone try and explain to me why I'm wrong in laymans terms?

TIA.
 
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Time dilation is derived using ideal perfectly functioning clocks - look up the light clock. Atomic clocks were not invented when relativity was first developed.

And if you look at it in terms of geometry, time dilation is just the same as the distance between two flat planes depending on whether you measure the perpendicular distance or the distance at an angle. It's not very mysterious, just not something you encounter at low speed.
 
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Thread closed for Moderation...
 
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Time dilation is hardly a "clock error". As @Ibix stated, it is a consequence of special relativity that has been well-established for quite some time. Same for the Twin "Paradox".

This thread will remain closed.
 
  • #5
paul1365 said:
According to a video I watched recently
This is not a good way to learn physics. You need to be looking at textbooks or peer-reviewed papers.

paul1365 said:
can someone try and explain to me why I'm wrong in laymans terms?
No, because, in the words of Wolfgang Pauli, you are not even wrong. You are not learning from good sources, and you are misinterpreting the information you are getting, and this is leading you to form personal theories (which are off limits for PF discussion anyway) that are too far off the mark to even be corrected.

Your best bet at this point would be to forget everything you think you know about time dilation and relativity, and start from scratch learning from a good textbook. Taylor & Wheeler's Spacetime Physics is a good textbook on special relativity. Sean Carroll's online lecture notes on General Relativity are a good introduction to both special and general relativity. Both of those sources include discussions of time dilation, although the Taylor & Wheeler textbook, IIRC, only discusses time dilation due to relative motion, whereas Carroll also discusses time dilation in a gravitational field, which you also mention.

If you have further questions after spending some time with valid sources such as the above, by all means post a new thread with your questions. But in the meantime, this thread will remain closed as we do not even have a valid basis for discussion.
 

Related to Exploring Time Dilation: A Layman's Perspective

1. What is time dilation?

Time dilation is a phenomenon in which time appears to pass slower for an object moving at high speeds or in a strong gravitational field compared to an object at rest.

2. How does time dilation relate to Einstein's theory of relativity?

Time dilation is a consequence of Einstein's theory of relativity, specifically the theory of special relativity. It states that the laws of physics are the same for all observers in uniform motion and that the speed of light is constant.

3. Can time dilation be observed in everyday life?

Yes, time dilation can be observed in everyday life, although the effects are very small. For example, GPS satellites must account for time dilation in order to accurately calculate positions on Earth.

4. How does time dilation impact space travel?

Time dilation has a significant impact on space travel, especially for objects traveling at high speeds or near massive objects like black holes. It can cause astronauts to experience time at a different rate than people on Earth, leading to differences in aging.

5. Is time dilation a proven concept?

Yes, time dilation has been proven through numerous experiments and observations, including the famous Hafele-Keating experiment in 1971. It is also an essential component of modern physics and is used in various technologies, such as GPS systems.

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