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Find the Resultant Force

  1. Sep 11, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Particle A with a charge of 45 micro Coulombs is located on the x-axis at a point -11 cm from the origin. Particle B with a charge of 41 micro Coulombs is located on the y-axis at a point +68 cm from the origin. What is the magnitude of the electrostatic force that Particle A exerts on Particle B? (Answer in Newtons.)



    2. Relevant equations

    Coulomb's Law: Fe=ke(q1q2/r^2)

    3. The attempt at a solution

    (8.99x10^9)((45x10^6)(41x10^6))/11^2

    (8.99x10^9)((41x10^6)(41x10^6))/2(68^2)

    Not sure what to do next or if this is even right so far. I think I have to do something w/ the x and y components and find the degree of the angle, which I'm not sure how to do.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 11, 2009 #2

    rl.bhat

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    First of all convert distances from cm to meter. Then find the distance r between A and B.
    Now using the relevant equation find the force on B by A.
     
  4. Sep 12, 2009 #3
    so would it be (8.99x10^9)((4.5x10^-5)(4.1x10^-5))/(.79)^2 ?
     
  5. Sep 12, 2009 #4
    what do you have to do differently when one charge is on the x axis and the other is on the y axis as appose to them both being on the x axis and you just add them together?
     
  6. Sep 12, 2009 #5

    rl.bhat

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    The distance between A and B is sqrt(OA^2 + OB^2)
    O.79 m is the distance between A and B if they are on the x axis.
     
  7. Sep 12, 2009 #6
    so what if one of the charges is on the y axis?
     
  8. Sep 12, 2009 #7

    rl.bhat

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    Then the distance between A and B is sqrt(OA^2 + OB^2)
     
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