Gravitational Wave System and Locations

In summary: in a space-time location system.#gravitationalwaves#ligo#spacetimelocation#spacetime#spacetime#waveforms
  • #1
Eumeme
1
0
TL;DR Summary
I was just speculating if we could use “gravitational waves detection waveform” as a fingerprint of our current “spacetime location” in the Universe.
My hypothesis:

A sequence with the gravitational waves detected, sent by modulating radio waves, could be received and used by other intelligent beings to find the corresponding sequence within their records and then compare it to calculate our spacetime position in relation to theirs.

As gravitational waves in vacuum travel at the light speed, the different time-ratio between events could be used to triangulate the position and the time of the originating signal (like GPS does).

The gravitational bursts received in other POV could even swap in the time sequence, but the waveforms should still contain enough information (as we can calculate the relative masses of the colliding objects from it) that an AI should be able to discover their corresponding sequence.
I guess the longer the sequence we transmit, the easier and more accurate should be the match... (in a way the sequence comparison seems to resemble spectrography, but in time instead of space)

Similarly I guess we could alter our recorded sequence to “SpaceTimeLocate” any position within a certain range, i guess by rearranging the amplitude and the timing of the bursts.

my kindly questions to Physicists and other Experts 😅:

a. what would be the maximum error in our space-time location if we use the whole sequence we have collected so far? (I guess the error would have 4 dimensions)

b. How is the error related to the number of events collected? And to the time-span?

c. Can you confirm the intuition that our sequence would contain also information about our movement across spacetime, like orbiting around the sun and bobbling up and down in the galaxy plane?

d. How difficult would be the math necessary to convert “our” gravitational waveforms sequence into the waveform perceived on a different viewpoint in the visible Universe?

e. Is there any research about this?


From what i can imagine with my limited math capabilities, it seems that LIGO and other detectors sequence could become our “IP address” in the Universe, that billion years old AGI in the future could use in a super slow hyper galactic communication system with other leviathan AGI to identify themselves and to share cosmic history or maybe even run experiments together over billions years span time and billions lightyears space 😅 #scifi #seti

Thank you for you invaluable time 🙏 and forgive my verbosity, but today is my 3D(15) birthday and i indulged 😅✨🌈bruno #eumeme moroni
#USTPS relative UKSW161NY@20201216185321
(error almost 500 mq * 500 s 😅 yes, crazy #supernerd here)

#UniversalSpaceTimePositioningSystem
#UniversalSpaceTimeLocation
 
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  • #2
Eumeme said:
As gravitational waves in vacuum travel at the light speed, the different time-ratio between events could be used to triangulate the position and the time of the originating signal (like GPS does).

Unfortunately, the analogy with GPS fails for two reasons.

First, GPS satellites are not one-time sources. They send out continuous radar signals with information encoded in them. That is because a one-time source can only give "triangulation" information for one instant, and that's not what we want. But gravitational wave sources such as black hole mergers that we observe with LIGO are one-time sources.

Second, for GPS to work, it requires a clock synchronization convention. GPS satellites encode time stamp information in the signals they send, and GPS receivers keep track of their own clock time and compare the time of reception by their clock with the time stamps in the received signals. This only works if all the clocks involved share a common synchronization convention. In GPS, this is achieved because the satellites get signals from ground clocks telling them how to adjust their clocks, and the satellites then include this updating information in the signals they send to receivers. Since the advent of the Internet, GPS receivers can also get updated clock time over the Internet.

But a distant gravitational wave source of course cannot participate in any such clock synchronization scheme with Earth. Neither could some distant civilization that is also observing the sources.

For these reasons, I do not think there is a way to get GPS-style "position information" from distant gravitational wave sources, or share it with distant civilizations elsewhere in the universe.
 
  • #3
Indeed you would not be able to get a GPS style triangulation, but gravitational waves do have the advantage that they are not blocked by dust or other things that block electromagnetic waves. I am sure that feature would be somehow useful
 

Related to Gravitational Wave System and Locations

1. What are gravitational waves and how are they produced?

Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of space-time caused by the acceleration of massive objects. They are produced when two massive objects, such as black holes or neutron stars, orbit each other and eventually merge.

2. How are gravitational waves detected?

Gravitational waves are detected using specialized instruments called interferometers. These instruments use lasers to measure tiny changes in the distance between two points caused by passing gravitational waves.

3. Where are the most sensitive locations for detecting gravitational waves?

The most sensitive locations for detecting gravitational waves are in remote areas with minimal environmental disturbances, such as underground or in space. Examples of these locations include the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in the United States and the Virgo interferometer in Italy.

4. Can gravitational waves be used for anything besides detection?

Yes, gravitational waves have the potential to provide valuable information about the universe and its origins. They can also be used to test Einstein's theory of general relativity and potentially lead to new technologies.

5. Are there different types of gravitational wave systems?

Yes, there are two main types of gravitational wave systems: compact binary systems and continuous wave systems. Compact binary systems involve the merging of two massive objects, while continuous wave systems involve the rotation of a single massive object, such as a pulsar.

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